Storm Damage & Insurance Specialists!

Roofer in Sullivan's Island, SC

We find ways to get insurance to cover not only repairs, but complete roof replacements, siding, gutters and windows

If you're a homeowner or a business owner, take a moment to think about the roof of your home or storefront. When was the last time it was inspected for leaks and general reliability? If you're like most folks in the Lowcountry, it's been a while. When it comes to home maintenance, your roof is one of the last items that you consider for repairs and replacements. Maybe that's because DIY roof repairs and roof replacements are difficult and dangerous for the average person. Maybe it's because your roof has been a steadfast symbol of reliability and protection for years. Whatever the reason, we get it - roofing issues just aren't something that people want to face.

If you're a homeowner or a business owner, take a moment to think about the roof of your home or storefront. When was the last time it was inspected for leaks and general reliability? If you're like most folks in the Lowcountry, it's been a while. When it comes to home maintenance, your roof is one of the last items that you consider for repairs and replacements. Maybe that's because DIY roof repairs and roof replacements are difficult and dangerous for the average person. Maybe it's because your roof has been a steadfast symbol of reliability and protection for years. Whatever the reason, we get it - roofing issues just aren't something that people want to face.

Service Areas

The 843 Roof Difference

head-bot-style

As innovators in the roofing industry, we take roof repair in Sullivan's Island seriously. Your roof is an integral player in your family's safety, and as such, it deserves the very best service possible. When it's no longer protecting your family like it should, we'll replace it with a better alternative.

Roofer Sullivan's Island, SC

If you're reading this, though, you're probably curious to learn more about our company. As our name denotes, we live in the Lowcountry. Our kids go to school in the Lowcountry. Our families are here in the Lowcountry - and we strive to serve others here in the Lowcountry just as we would like to be served. With more than 20 years of combined expertise mastering the craft of roofing, we're proud to epitomize honesty, integrity, and respect with every service we offer. To that point, some of our most popular roofing services include the following:

  • Free Estimates
  • Roof Inspections
  • Roof Repair
  • Roof Maintenance
  • Roof Replacement
  • Commercial Roofing Services
  • Leaky Roof Repair
  • Flat Roof Repair

So, whether it's a small repair for a few blown-off shingles or catastrophic damage after a hurricane, our team of professionals has the tools and training to provide peace of mind when you need it most. If you see our trucks out, please stop us, and introduce yourself! It would be our pleasure to get to know you and your family and provide you with the quality roofing services you deserve.

Speaking of South Carolina roofing services, our licensed and highly-trained technicians are the cream of the crop. We can help with just about any roofing need you have and strive to do so with the utmost respect for your time and property.

Our Process

head-bot-style

From minor leak fixes to total roof replacement in Sullivan's Island, there's no job too large or small for 843 Roof. Regardless of the roofing service you need, we follow a specific process to ensure your safety, satisfaction, and peace of mind.

We Consult with You

We Consult with You

During your first consultation, we'll meet with you one-on-one so that we can better understand the scope of work regarding your roof. After we evaluate your roof, we'll go in-depth about your roof repair or replacement options, taking care to consider your budget and unique needs.

Proposal

Proposal

Once we have a good understanding of your roofing needs, we'll craft a detailed roofing proposal for your home or business. In your proposal, we'll include information about the materials we'll use for your roofing job, a timeline of when we'll finish, and the estimated costs you'll need to pay.

Our Roofers Get to Work

Our Roofers Get to Work

Once you approve our proposal, we're off to the races. During your project installation, we treat your home as if it were our own - no questions asked. Over the course of your project, our team of expert roofing contractors will work tirelessly to provide you with the high-level craftsmanship you expect. Of course, we'll keep you updated on our progress, and when we're done, we'll clean up behind ourselves.

We Conduct a Final Inspection

We Conduct a Final Inspection

Once your roofing project is complete, we'll swoop in for a final inspection to ensure all t's are crossed, and all i's are dotted. After all, the devil is often found in the details, and we don't want that. If we find more work that needs to be done, we'll let you know and will complete that work ASAP. If you have questions, we'll address them before we hit the road. Once you're happy and protected from the elements, we'll move on to the next project, and you can enjoy life with a trustworthy roof over your head.

How Do I Choose a Quality Roofer in Sullivan's Island?

head-bot-style

At 843 Roof, we're proud to say that we put customers first. At the end of the day, their safety and security are of utmost importance. We know that any savvy home or business owner will do due diligence to find the best roofing company for their needs. To help ensure you get the very best products and services available, keep these questions in mind.

Roofer Sullivan's Island, SC

1. Can you tell me about your experience in the roofing industry?

Think of this question a little bit like a job interview, if you were the hiring manager. You're not asking how long the company has been in business - you're asking about their overall level of experience as roofers. If it seems like they're new to the game, consider other options. At 843 Roof, our contractors have 20+ years of combined knowledge, with decades of on-site experience handling a wide range of roofing projects, both large and small.


2. Do you have insurance?

Any South Carolina roofer worth their salt will have company insurance that protects your property and home in the event of accidental damage. In fact, they should be willing to show you their certificate of insurance as proof. Contact 843 Roof today to learn more about our insurance and how it protects your home.


3. Will you give me a written estimate?

If you ever encounter a roofing company that is unwilling to give you a written estimate, be wary. Like 843 Roof, a great roofing company will happily provide a written estimate containing the details and description of your roofing project.

4. Will you tell me about shingle styles and roof choices if I need a roof replacement?

Replacing your roof is a serious investment. As such, your roofing contractor should be able to talk at length about your roof replacement options, from the style of shingles or other materials you need, to the type of roof best suited to your property. At 843 Roof, we always provide our customers with plenty of info on roof styles, material choices, prices, and more, so they can make an informed decision about their roof replacement.


5. Can you give me a list of references?

This might sound a tad "old school," especially with the prevalence of online reviews. With that said, the very best roofers will happily give you a list of references to check and will encourage you to reach out to them. At 843 Roof, our reviews speak for themselves - please contact us directly for roof repair and replacement references.


843 Roof Pro Tip

At the end of the day, trust your gut. Do you feel the roofing contractor you're speaking with has a good communication style? Do you feel they take the time to listen to your concerns and answer your questions? Regardless of the price differences between roofing companies, trust your instincts when it comes to the best fit for you and your project. If you're running into communication issues before the project even starts, it's a big red flag.

Roofer Sullivan's Island, SC

Roof Repair in Sullivan's Island A Service Too Important to Ignore

head-bot-style

Maintaining a secure roof for your home and family is crucial. Any necessary repairs should be taken seriously - even if they don't seem so serious on the surface. A failed or leaky roof can lead to disastrous consequences, which is why it's imperative that you seek professional help rather than attempting to fix the issue yourself.

Roofer Sullivan's Island, SC

At 843 Roof, our experts understand how devastating it is when water, weather, or critters damage your roof. These issues often affect every inch of your home, from the insulation in the attic down to your basement family room. As a homeowner, you want to ensure that your home is protected and secure, and our roofers can help make that happen.

Some of the most popular roof repair services we provide to our amazing clients in South Carolina include:

  • Asphalt Shingle Repair
  • Roof Leak Repair
  • Gutter Repair
  • Roof Flashing Repair
  • Roof Ventilation Repair
  • Roof Mildew Removal
  • Storm Damage Repair
  • Tree Damage Repair
  • Standing Water Repair
  • Much More

If you're on the fence about whether or not you should have your roof inspected for repairs, don't wait any longer. Your home's roof might only be a South Carolina thunderstorm away from needing to be completely replaced. Before you have to deal with a huge roofing headache, call 843 Roof and let us do the hard work for you.

Start Fresh with a Roof Replacement in Sullivan's Island

head-bot-style

When it comes to getting a new roof for your home, there's no room for error. That's why you need licensed professionals who can handle complex and intensive processes with ease. While it may seem like a significant investment, the long-term benefits are undeniable. You'll enjoy increased safety, comfort, and a higher home value. At 843 Roof, we're the top choice for roof installations in South Carolina.

Our team of experts has a proven track record of successful roof replacement projects. Unlike some roofing companies, we hold ourselves to the highest standards for product longevity, customer satisfaction, and quality craftsmanship. Whether you're looking to upgrade your roof or need a replacement due to damage or disrepair, we're the experts you can rely on.

We specialize in a number of roof replacement options, including the following:

  • Asphalt Shingle Roof Replacement
  • Slate Roof Replacement
  • Metal Roof Replacement
  • Clay Tile Roof Replacement
  • Residential Roof Replacement
  • Commercial Roof Replacement
Roofer Sullivan's Island, SC

Most Popular Roof Replacement Materials in South Carolina

Get Estimateright-arrow

Your roof is one of the sturdiest components of your home. Like all things, however, it can deteriorate with time. That's especially true in South Carolina, where humidity, storms, hurricanes, and tree damage can take a toll. Before you know it, your roof has sprung a leak, which can snowball into bigger issues. When you're shelling out money every quarter for roof maintenance, you will reach a point where a roof replacement in Sullivan's Island makes the most sense. That's where 843 Roof comes into play.

At 843 Roof, we understand your desire for a high-quality new roof that meets your needs and budget. Our team of experts will work closely with you to ensure transparency in our pricing and supplies used, providing unbeatable value for your investment. With a focus on top-notch customer service, we guarantee an exceptional experience when you choose us, whether you need a roof replacement for your home or business.

But choosing a new roof can be easier said than done. There are a lot of things to consider, such as choosing the roof replacement materials you want to use. To help make your life a little easier, keep these popular options in mind.

Asphalt shingles have a wide range of colors, styles, shapes, and sizes to suit your needs, too. One of the major advantages of asphalt shingles is their affordability compared to other roofing materials like slate and metal, which can be pricey. However, it's important to note that asphalt shingles may not hold up as well as slate and metal during hurricanes in South Carolina. Fortunately, advancements in technology have led to the development of premium quality asphalt shingles with increased durability, such as those with algae-resistant granules or impact-resistant reinforcements, which can better protect against severe weather conditions.

Pros:

  • Very Affordable
  • Endless Options
  • Easy to Install
  • Lightweight
  • Good All-Around Option

Cons:

  • Not all options are durable
  • Some sensitivity to extreme weather conditions and temperatures

Asphalt Shingle Roof Replacement Options

Asphalt shingles are a popular and cost-effective choice for many property owners due to their versatility and durability. These shingles are made up of layers of fiberglass mat that are coated with asphalt and covered with ceramic granules for protection against various elements such as moisture, wind, hail, and UV rays. This combination of materials makes asphalt shingles resistant to fire, rot, and pests.

Roofer Sullivan's Island, SC

Slate Roof Replacement Options

Roofer Sullivan's Island, SC

Slate roofing is a high-quality roofing material that is popular in South Carolina for its distinctive appearance and long-lasting benefits. Natural stone slabs form the composition of slate roofs, which are highly durable and fire-resistant. They're also resistant to rot, insects, hail, and wind damage, making them perfect for safeguarding homes in South Carolina. When considering this option, be sure to consider how long you plan to live in your current home before committing. Installation costs may be higher than other options since slate tends to be more labor-intensive than other materials.

Pros:

  • Beautiful Aesthetics
  • Long Lifespan
  • Eco-Friendly
  • Great for Protection Against South Carolina Summers & Winters

Cons:

  • Can be Fragile
  • Specialty Installation May be Required
  • Can be More Costly Than Other Roofing Options

They are lighter in weight, making them easier to install, and resistant to hail, wind, fire, and UV rays, making them ideal for protecting against harsh weather conditions common in South Carolina. What's more, metal roofs often come with long warranties and tend to be more energy-efficient than traditional roofs. With a variety of colors and styles available, you can customize your home's appearance while still taking advantage of the longevity and protection that metal roofs provide.

Pros:

  • Lightweight
  • Straightforward Roof Repairs in Sullivan's Island
  • Potential for Lower Heating and Cooling Bills
  • Trendy and Cost-Effective

Cons:

  • May Require Specialized Installation
  • Environment Causes Metal to Expand and Contract

Metal Roof Replacement Options

Metal roofing is an excellent choice for those looking for durability, longevity, and resilience against extreme weather conditions. With a composition of thin sheets or panels of steel, aluminum, copper, or other metals typically recycled from other sources, metal roofs offer many advantages over traditional asphalt shingle roofs.

Roofer Sullivan's Island, SC

What Client Say About Us

Exceptional Quality. Steadfast Customer Service. Reliable Roofing, Guaranteed.

head-bot-style

843 Roof was born out of dedication to our customers and a steadfast commitment to quality. Unlike some roofing companies in South Carolina, our business strategy is simple: work hard, don't cut corners, be honest, and provide reliable roofing guidance. It's really that simple. Whether you need a complete roof replacement, minor repairs, or something in between, your satisfaction is always top of mind. Contact our office today to experience the 843 Roof difference.

phone-number843-900-7663

Get Estimate

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Visitors and residents recall coyote encounters, attacks on Sullivan’s Island

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Several Sullivan’s Island dog walkers and regulars are speaking up about their personal experiences with coyotes.This comes a day after town officials reported five coyote-led attacks involving dogs within the month of August.They say the wild animals has been approaching people, dogs and roaming open areas of the beach more often than usual.The Jourdan family says they experienced a too-close encounter with a coyote over the weekend.“They were out halfway to the ...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Several Sullivan’s Island dog walkers and regulars are speaking up about their personal experiences with coyotes.

This comes a day after town officials reported five coyote-led attacks involving dogs within the month of August.

They say the wild animals has been approaching people, dogs and roaming open areas of the beach more often than usual.

The Jourdan family says they experienced a too-close encounter with a coyote over the weekend.

“They were out halfway to the water, from the dune, so middle of the beach. And they were attacked by coyotes,” Jourdan said.

Five-year-old Willie Nelson, the Jourdan family dog, was taken by two coyotes early Saturday morning while on a walk with a babysitter.

Jourdan says it happened in broad daylight and in the middle of the beach.

He adds the family was devastated by the loss of their “wonder dog.”

“I was trying to get closure for my family’s sake, for Willie, because we weren’t even there. Which was frustrating. I crawled on my belly for over four miles between stations 26 and 28,” Jourdan said.

The attack occurred at Station 27, a part of the beach several residents have called a “breeding ground” for coyote packs.

Officials with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources say the breed has been approaching people, dogs and roaming open areas of the beach more often.

They add that mid-summer and fall are peak active times for these animals, meaning it is when coyotes migrate to new spaces, feed and have young.

SCDNR officials say another reason for the increased interactions could be from them being opportunistic feeders, meaning they will be quick and take anything they need.

Others say they have been chased by coyotes in the past but escaped.

“We were walking in June when a coyote came out of the dunes and started chasing,” Sullivan’s regular Shelly Carson said. “I was able to chase it away, and it ran down the beach to chase a golden retriever.”

Now, they avoid the area altogether or take proactive measures to be able to walk safely.

“I’ve always known there are coyotes here,” Carson said. “Never seen one until this year. Really, March was the first time I had my first sighting and started carrying pepper spray on the beach. In June I started carrying a birdie alarm. And now I carry a stick with me too.”

Visitors are asking for help from officials to curb the problem.

“It’s close to our hearts, but the coyote system is unfortunately not something that is new, declining or lessened. Rather the opposite,” Jourdan said.

They ask for coyote population control, area management and listening to residential concerns.

Town officials say they do have systems in place to manage the problem, which include education, tracking, hazing and lethal control.

They ask anyone who experiences an encounter or sighting to report the problem immediately.

If you run into a coyote, you’re advised to react loudly, throw small sticks or cans or spray the animal with water.

For more information on coyotes along Sullivan’s Island, click here.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

SCE&G's former seaside worker perk eyed for $30M-plus social club on Sullivan's Island

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND — A newly formed development group plans to invest more than $30 million to acquire and renovate a 90-year-old, vacant private oceanfront club on this seaside enclave.But elected officials want more details before signing off on allowing a commercial project in a residential area.Sulli...

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND — A newly formed development group plans to invest more than $30 million to acquire and renovate a 90-year-old, vacant private oceanfront club on this seaside enclave.

But elected officials want more details before signing off on allowing a commercial project in a residential area.

Sullivan's Island Bathing Co. is asking the town to allow a members-only social venture called the Ocean Club at 1735 Atlantic Ave. as a conditional use in an area zoned for single-family homes.

Shep Davis, the development firm's managing partner, pointed out last week that the property operated as a private club for close to a century without being open to island residents.

Under this latest proposal, they'll have that option for the first time — at a cost of a $60,000 sign-up fee and an estimated $500 in monthly dues.

The property had been known for decades as the Sand Dunes Club. It was a private beachside retreat for employees of the former South Carolina Electric & Gas Co., which Dominion Energy acquired in early 2019 after the V.C. Summer nuclear plant debacle 18 months earlier.

The Richmond, Va.-based utility closed the property at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, and it never reopened, according to attorney Brian Hellman, a Sullivan's resident who is representing the development group.

Built in 1933 for $14,000, the then 5,400-square-foot structure was called Jasper Hall, an officer's club for military personnel stationed at nearby Fort Moultrie. SCE&G acquired it in the 1950s and expanded it over the years to just under 10,000 square feet.

Davis said the property has not been properly kept up for several years and is in disrepair.

One neighbor recently complained of the uncovered pool starting to smell and becoming a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Hellman and Davis said the pool is being maintained.

$30 million-plus

Davis estimated it will take an investment of "in excess of $30 million" for his group to buy the property, overhaul the building and amenities and place a stormwater retention pond underground. Retrofitting the pool alone, he said could cost half a million dollars.

Real Estate

Improvement plans include offering separate pools for families and adults, upgrading the existing building and landscaping the parking area. The developers also would add a fitness center, dining terrace and gazebo along with a new entry area off a beach access path.

"We can preserve the building and re-create the club for its historical use," Davis said.

Hellman said the current proposal comes after gathering input during several meetings with residents and town leaders over the past few months.

He said the private-membership venue will provide a place for homeowners to eat and exercise without having to drive off the island or jockey for tables with tourists at the restaurants in the town's small business district.

"It will be a gathering place to socialize that won't compete with beachgoers," Hellman said. "Dining will not be open to the general public and will reduce the need for residents to leave the island."

The 3.5-acre club site is owned by a company affiliated with Charleston real estate investor John Derbyshire, the former owner of the chain of Money Man Pawn shops. The firm paid Dominion $16.2 million for the property in 2022, according to Charleston County land records.

A large house is being built for Derbyshire, who plans to remain a partner in the project, on part of the property next to the club, according to Hellman.

Members matters

Get the best of the Post and Courier's Real Estate news, handpicked and delivered to your inbox each Saturday.

Email

The developer said the goal is that the Ocean Club will be open to all Sullivan's residents who want to join. Davis estimated the venture will need at least 400 members to get the project off the ground.

The proposed Ocean Club would give priority to individuals and families who primarily reside on the island, said Jim Wanless, one of the partners. Off-island residents could join, too.

Real Estate

The proposed parking rules to allow a social club in a residential area require at least one parking space for every 10 memberships whose primary or secondary residences are within 2½ miles. Sixty percent of those spaces must be designated for golf carts and low-speed vehicles.

For members living outside the 2½-mile range, which is basically anyone who doesn't live on Sullivan's, one vehicle parking space would be required for every five memberships.

The rules also would require one bicycle space — through a rack or corral — for every 20 memberships.

"For whatever the number will be of those living off the island, they most certainly would come by car," Davis said. "On-island residents would have much less need for parking" since they'd have the option to come by golf cart, bike or foot.

Tentative plans call for 50 car parking spaces, at least an equal number of golf cart spaces and "adequate" bicycle parking spaces, Hellman said.

Though the membership will be open to all island residents, the developers don't expect everyone to join. They also have not set a cap on membership.

"We are trying to come up with the right number of members for the club without excluding property owners," Davis said.

Talking to the town

During a public workshop last week, where a standing-room-only crowd spilled into the hallway, the developers addressed a list of written questions from elected officials, including the benefit to the town if the club is allowed.

Davis said, under the current zoning, the property could be sold for residential development that would allow three to five homes that could be taxed at the 4 percent rate if they are primary residences. If the club use is allowed, the developers will pay the 6 percent commercial property tax as well as licensing and permit fees.

Real Estate

The developers also said they won't allow corporate memberships or agreements with hotels to provide dining or other services. In addition, no reciprocal-use deals with other private clubs are planned.

The projected hours of operation are 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday for interior services, with the earliest morning hours set aside for fitness activities. The club would be open until midnight on Friday and Saturday. Outdoor activities would be allowed 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. each day except until 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Some island residents see the idea as another amenity for Sullivan's while others are concerned about increased traffic and noise a club would bring to a residential area.

In letters to the town, supporters pointed to the property's long history as a site for dining, fitness, sports, recreation and cultural, educational and social events. They said those uses should continue to be allowed.

Others said they're against the rezoning to allow a restaurant or for it to become a for-profit entity.

Town Council is expected to discuss the issue further and take public input during its meeting Aug. 15. Mayor Patrick O'Neil cautioned the developers not to expect a quick decision.

"This council proceeds pretty deliberately," he said.

Our twice-weekly newsletter features all the business stories shaping Charleston and South Carolina. Get ahead with us - it's free.

Email

Reach Warren L. Wise at wwise@postandcourier.com. Follow him on Twitter @warrenlancewise.

Brrrr! 3 Charleston-area polar plunges to attend New Year’s Day

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCBD) – It’s a popular tradition that many participate in right here along the South Carolina coast – braving the cold ocean temperatures for a quick dip (and we mean quick) to welcome the new year.One of the first polar bear plunges dates back to the early 1900s when the L Street Brownies in Boston took the plunge into the icy cold Dorchester Bay in 1904. The club has been celebrating the new year with a plunge ever since, according to ...

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCBD) – It’s a popular tradition that many participate in right here along the South Carolina coast – braving the cold ocean temperatures for a quick dip (and we mean quick) to welcome the new year.

One of the first polar bear plunges dates back to the early 1900s when the L Street Brownies in Boston took the plunge into the icy cold Dorchester Bay in 1904. The club has been celebrating the new year with a plunge ever since, according to NationalToday.com.

While many take the dip for fun, some plunge into freezing waters to raise funds for charities. It’s also believed the dips boost the immune system, activate endorphins, and reduce stress.

Dunleavy’s Pub on Sullivan’s Island organizes its polar bear plunge each year in support of Special Olympics of South Carolina. The organization provides year-round sports training and athletic competition in myriad Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities.

Plungers will gather on the beach for the pub’s 29th annual polar plunge at 2:00 p.m. on New Year’s Day. Dunleavy’s Pub is located at 2213 Middle Street on Sullivans Island.

Over on Seabrook Island, plungers will gather for the town’s polar bear plunge at North Beach near Boardwalk 1 at 10:30 a.m. Attendees can then warm up near a bonfire while sipping on some hot chocolate.

Finally, Folly Beach will host its 10th annual Bill Murray Look-a-like Polar Plunge on the beach New Year’s Day. Hundreds of people attend the Polar Plunge each year, many of whom come dressed as their favorite Bill Murray characters.

There is a costume contest that starts at 12:30 p.m., and the plunge takes place at 1:30 p.m. beachside at the Tides Hotel.

Ocean temperatures are currently at about 56 degrees in Charleston Harbor. The temperature along the beaches is expected to be around 58 degrees under a mostly sunny sky on Jan. 1

Letters: Private club is wrong for Sullivan's Island neighborhood

I have lived on Sullivan’s Island since 1997.In a recent article about an exclusive club being proposed for the island, developer Shep Davis said, “The property operated as a private club for close to a century without being open to Island residents.”This is not true.When SCE&G owned the ...

I have lived on Sullivan’s Island since 1997.

In a recent article about an exclusive club being proposed for the island, developer Shep Davis said, “The property operated as a private club for close to a century without being open to Island residents.”

This is not true.

When SCE&G owned the Sand Dunes Club, island residents were allowed to buy passes to use the swimming pool for a very nominal fee.

The Sullivan’s Island Park Foundation held its annual fundraiser at the club. Innumerable residents used it for weddings, graduation parties, family reunions as well as bat and bar mitzvah parties.

The developers are requesting that Town Council change the zoning ordinances to allow for commercial use in a residential neighborhood.

This is a very slippery slope and a path Town Council must not take.

Single-family residential zoning has always been sacred on Sullivan’s Island, and separation between commercial and residential neighborhoods has always been maintained.

This is one of the things that makes our island special.

If an exclusive private club in the middle of a residential neighborhood is allowed on Sullivan’s Island, it could tear an irreparable hole in the fabric of our community.

PAT VOTAVA

Sullivan’s Island

Thanks for the recent, important editorial urging the S.C. Department of Transportation to improve safety conditions on King Street for people with wheels and pedestrians.

Speaking as a downtown resident without a car or bike, however, I am also concerned about the hazards of walking on Charleston’s many broken sidewalks.

I recently was dismayed to watch a young man in a wheelchair struggle to get past the broken sidewalk at 41 George St. near the College of Charleston. (I offered a push, but he declined and likely was embarrassed).

My husband fell a short time ago while trying to walk on the protruding and missing red bricks outside the college.

There are broken sidewalk pieces, and some sidewalks end in the middle of the block.

Is there any reason to allow safety cones to decorate a hole in the sidewalk for months at the corner of Meeting Street and Wragg Square?

Three months ago, I sent a list with photos of broken or unfinished sidewalks to the city authorities.

Two sites were fixed immediately on Calhoun Street in front of Gaillard Center (this was during Spoleto season), but most of the rest remain hazardous.

SHARON FRATEPIETRO

Charleston

Solomon Stevens’ commentary of July 30 said we have to resist the temptation to try to make our schools an extension of the moral or religious orientation of our homes. He wrote schools were never intended to be that and should not be that.

Yale University was founded as a Christian educational institution. In the book, “Sex and God at Yale,” author Nathan Harden chronicles the efforts of a secular president to replace that religious orientation with one based on raw secularism.

Among other things, he brought to the campus a lecturer who produced pornographic movies and claimed to have had sex with scores of women.

Things got so out of hand, the president was fired.

My point is that if Christians are not militant — in a nonviolent way — about what is being taught in schools, people who despise them and their beliefs will rush in to fill that vacuum.

When Thomas Jefferson wrote for “separation of church and state,” he did not write for separation of Christianity and state.

Mr. Stevens wrote our children need to learn how to think critically. That includes weighing and balancing competing arguments.

I agree. They need to balance 400 years of Christian teaching in this country with what has taken place in the non-Christian countries of the world.

Would we be better off today if our forefathers had embraced their religions and philosophies? Of course not.

I believe all public schools should teach the fundamental concepts of Christianity in order to provide the students with a basic understanding of the premise behind the many movements that have sharped our country.

Whether it was abolition, labor, civil rights or other movements, Christian principles have played a profound role.

Only after students understand this can they make intelligent judgments about competing arguments and how to confront complexities of the world around them.

GARY H. KNIGHT

Holly Hill

To submit a letter to the editor, send an email to letters@postandcourier.com or fill out the form on our online portal.

Letters can be a maximum of 250 words and are subject to editing for clarity, tone and libel. They must carry the writer’s name and address for publication and a daytime telephone number for verification.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Sullivan's Island group urges protection of Maritime Forest

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island For All wants to make sure people know not only the beauty of the Maritime Forest, but also how it protects the community.Karen Byko, the president of Sullivan's Island For All, says the forest is more than just a home for wildlife.Read more: ...

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island For All wants to make sure people know not only the beauty of the Maritime Forest, but also how it protects the community.

Karen Byko, the president of Sullivan's Island For All, says the forest is more than just a home for wildlife.

Read more: Lowcountry law enforcement helps those in need at Seacoast Church

"The trees here are protecting us, so we need to protect them," she said. "The Maritime Forest provides a vegetative wall between the ocean and the homeowners, so that as storm surge comes in from the ocean, they provide that wall to protect us from that water. It's critically important that we preserve these trees to protect the island from that kind of destructive erosion."

Byko says there are some threats to this forest, such as the illegal cutting of the trees.

"We have people frequently who come out here and cut into public land trust, trees, and vegetation they do not own and they don't have a right to do," she said. "This land is protected for all of us to be able to enjoy."

According to Byko, everyone should care about this issue. She advocates for the protection of these 195 acres.

0 seconds of 0 secondsVolume 90%

Sullivan's Island For All wants to make sure people know not only the beauty of the Maritime Forest, but also how it protects the community. (WCIV)

"We live in a world where we know the effects of climate change are accelerating," Byko said. "We know these types of habitats are increasingly being destroyed and eroded. I just encourage everybody to come out here and know why we are fighting so hard to try to save this."

Byko also mentioned this forest is one of the last of its kind.

"There are very few places we can go to anymore that we can be in a wild space like this and be able to just enjoy it," Byko said. "If you look at maritime forests, you'll find there are very few that are left along the entire East Coast of the United States. This is one of the last few remaining Maritime Forests in the United States that's easily accessible to anybody."

"Anybody in Charleston can get in their car, drive over here, find a parking space, and enjoy the Maritime Forest," she said.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

Roof Maintenance, Installation, and Repairs Service
Any Questions? We are Ready to Help!

Icon