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Roofer in Awendaw, SC

We find ways to get insurance to cover not only repairs, but complete roof replacements, siding, gutters and windows

If you're a homeowner or a business owner, take a moment to think about the roof of your home or storefront. When was the last time it was inspected for leaks and general reliability? If you're like most folks in the Lowcountry, it's been a while. When it comes to home maintenance, your roof is one of the last items that you consider for repairs and replacements. Maybe that's because DIY roof repairs and roof replacements are difficult and dangerous for the average person. Maybe it's because your roof has been a steadfast symbol of reliability and protection for years. Whatever the reason, we get it - roofing issues just aren't something that people want to face.

If you're a homeowner or a business owner, take a moment to think about the roof of your home or storefront. When was the last time it was inspected for leaks and general reliability? If you're like most folks in the Lowcountry, it's been a while. When it comes to home maintenance, your roof is one of the last items that you consider for repairs and replacements. Maybe that's because DIY roof repairs and roof replacements are difficult and dangerous for the average person. Maybe it's because your roof has been a steadfast symbol of reliability and protection for years. Whatever the reason, we get it - roofing issues just aren't something that people want to face.

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The 843 Roof Difference

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As innovators in the roofing industry, we take roof repair in Awendaw seriously. Your roof is an integral player in your family's safety, and as such, it deserves the very best service possible. When it's no longer protecting your family like it should, we'll replace it with a better alternative.

Roofer Awendaw, SC

If you're reading this, though, you're probably curious to learn more about our company. As our name denotes, we live in the Lowcountry. Our kids go to school in the Lowcountry. Our families are here in the Lowcountry - and we strive to serve others here in the Lowcountry just as we would like to be served. With more than 20 years of combined expertise mastering the craft of roofing, we're proud to epitomize honesty, integrity, and respect with every service we offer. To that point, some of our most popular roofing services include the following:

  • Free Estimates
  • Roof Inspections
  • Roof Repair
  • Roof Maintenance
  • Roof Replacement
  • Commercial Roofing Services
  • Leaky Roof Repair
  • Flat Roof Repair

So, whether it's a small repair for a few blown-off shingles or catastrophic damage after a hurricane, our team of professionals has the tools and training to provide peace of mind when you need it most. If you see our trucks out, please stop us, and introduce yourself! It would be our pleasure to get to know you and your family and provide you with the quality roofing services you deserve.

Speaking of South Carolina roofing services, our licensed and highly-trained technicians are the cream of the crop. We can help with just about any roofing need you have and strive to do so with the utmost respect for your time and property.

Our Process

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From minor leak fixes to total roof replacement in Awendaw, there's no job too large or small for 843 Roof. Regardless of the roofing service you need, we follow a specific process to ensure your safety, satisfaction, and peace of mind.

We Consult with You

We Consult with You

During your first consultation, we'll meet with you one-on-one so that we can better understand the scope of work regarding your roof. After we evaluate your roof, we'll go in-depth about your roof repair or replacement options, taking care to consider your budget and unique needs.

Proposal

Proposal

Once we have a good understanding of your roofing needs, we'll craft a detailed roofing proposal for your home or business. In your proposal, we'll include information about the materials we'll use for your roofing job, a timeline of when we'll finish, and the estimated costs you'll need to pay.

Our Roofers Get to Work

Our Roofers Get to Work

Once you approve our proposal, we're off to the races. During your project installation, we treat your home as if it were our own - no questions asked. Over the course of your project, our team of expert roofing contractors will work tirelessly to provide you with the high-level craftsmanship you expect. Of course, we'll keep you updated on our progress, and when we're done, we'll clean up behind ourselves.

We Conduct a Final Inspection

We Conduct a Final Inspection

Once your roofing project is complete, we'll swoop in for a final inspection to ensure all t's are crossed, and all i's are dotted. After all, the devil is often found in the details, and we don't want that. If we find more work that needs to be done, we'll let you know and will complete that work ASAP. If you have questions, we'll address them before we hit the road. Once you're happy and protected from the elements, we'll move on to the next project, and you can enjoy life with a trustworthy roof over your head.

How Do I Choose a Quality Roofer in Awendaw?

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At 843 Roof, we're proud to say that we put customers first. At the end of the day, their safety and security are of utmost importance. We know that any savvy home or business owner will do due diligence to find the best roofing company for their needs. To help ensure you get the very best products and services available, keep these questions in mind.

Roofer Awendaw, SC

1. Can you tell me about your experience in the roofing industry?

Think of this question a little bit like a job interview, if you were the hiring manager. You're not asking how long the company has been in business - you're asking about their overall level of experience as roofers. If it seems like they're new to the game, consider other options. At 843 Roof, our contractors have 20+ years of combined knowledge, with decades of on-site experience handling a wide range of roofing projects, both large and small.


2. Do you have insurance?

Any South Carolina roofer worth their salt will have company insurance that protects your property and home in the event of accidental damage. In fact, they should be willing to show you their certificate of insurance as proof. Contact 843 Roof today to learn more about our insurance and how it protects your home.


3. Will you give me a written estimate?

If you ever encounter a roofing company that is unwilling to give you a written estimate, be wary. Like 843 Roof, a great roofing company will happily provide a written estimate containing the details and description of your roofing project.

4. Will you tell me about shingle styles and roof choices if I need a roof replacement?

Replacing your roof is a serious investment. As such, your roofing contractor should be able to talk at length about your roof replacement options, from the style of shingles or other materials you need, to the type of roof best suited to your property. At 843 Roof, we always provide our customers with plenty of info on roof styles, material choices, prices, and more, so they can make an informed decision about their roof replacement.


5. Can you give me a list of references?

This might sound a tad "old school," especially with the prevalence of online reviews. With that said, the very best roofers will happily give you a list of references to check and will encourage you to reach out to them. At 843 Roof, our reviews speak for themselves - please contact us directly for roof repair and replacement references.


843 Roof Pro Tip

At the end of the day, trust your gut. Do you feel the roofing contractor you're speaking with has a good communication style? Do you feel they take the time to listen to your concerns and answer your questions? Regardless of the price differences between roofing companies, trust your instincts when it comes to the best fit for you and your project. If you're running into communication issues before the project even starts, it's a big red flag.

Roofer Awendaw, SC

Roof Repair in Awendaw A Service Too Important to Ignore

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Maintaining a secure roof for your home and family is crucial. Any necessary repairs should be taken seriously - even if they don't seem so serious on the surface. A failed or leaky roof can lead to disastrous consequences, which is why it's imperative that you seek professional help rather than attempting to fix the issue yourself.

Roofer Awendaw, SC

At 843 Roof, our experts understand how devastating it is when water, weather, or critters damage your roof. These issues often affect every inch of your home, from the insulation in the attic down to your basement family room. As a homeowner, you want to ensure that your home is protected and secure, and our roofers can help make that happen.

Some of the most popular roof repair services we provide to our amazing clients in South Carolina include:

  • Asphalt Shingle Repair
  • Roof Leak Repair
  • Gutter Repair
  • Roof Flashing Repair
  • Roof Ventilation Repair
  • Roof Mildew Removal
  • Storm Damage Repair
  • Tree Damage Repair
  • Standing Water Repair
  • Much More

If you're on the fence about whether or not you should have your roof inspected for repairs, don't wait any longer. Your home's roof might only be a South Carolina thunderstorm away from needing to be completely replaced. Before you have to deal with a huge roofing headache, call 843 Roof and let us do the hard work for you.

Start Fresh with a Roof Replacement in Awendaw

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When it comes to getting a new roof for your home, there's no room for error. That's why you need licensed professionals who can handle complex and intensive processes with ease. While it may seem like a significant investment, the long-term benefits are undeniable. You'll enjoy increased safety, comfort, and a higher home value. At 843 Roof, we're the top choice for roof installations in South Carolina.

Our team of experts has a proven track record of successful roof replacement projects. Unlike some roofing companies, we hold ourselves to the highest standards for product longevity, customer satisfaction, and quality craftsmanship. Whether you're looking to upgrade your roof or need a replacement due to damage or disrepair, we're the experts you can rely on.

We specialize in a number of roof replacement options, including the following:

  • Asphalt Shingle Roof Replacement
  • Slate Roof Replacement
  • Metal Roof Replacement
  • Clay Tile Roof Replacement
  • Residential Roof Replacement
  • Commercial Roof Replacement
Roofer Awendaw, SC

Most Popular Roof Replacement Materials in South Carolina

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Your roof is one of the sturdiest components of your home. Like all things, however, it can deteriorate with time. That's especially true in South Carolina, where humidity, storms, hurricanes, and tree damage can take a toll. Before you know it, your roof has sprung a leak, which can snowball into bigger issues. When you're shelling out money every quarter for roof maintenance, you will reach a point where a roof replacement in Awendaw makes the most sense. That's where 843 Roof comes into play.

At 843 Roof, we understand your desire for a high-quality new roof that meets your needs and budget. Our team of experts will work closely with you to ensure transparency in our pricing and supplies used, providing unbeatable value for your investment. With a focus on top-notch customer service, we guarantee an exceptional experience when you choose us, whether you need a roof replacement for your home or business.

But choosing a new roof can be easier said than done. There are a lot of things to consider, such as choosing the roof replacement materials you want to use. To help make your life a little easier, keep these popular options in mind.

Asphalt shingles have a wide range of colors, styles, shapes, and sizes to suit your needs, too. One of the major advantages of asphalt shingles is their affordability compared to other roofing materials like slate and metal, which can be pricey. However, it's important to note that asphalt shingles may not hold up as well as slate and metal during hurricanes in South Carolina. Fortunately, advancements in technology have led to the development of premium quality asphalt shingles with increased durability, such as those with algae-resistant granules or impact-resistant reinforcements, which can better protect against severe weather conditions.

Pros:

  • Very Affordable
  • Endless Options
  • Easy to Install
  • Lightweight
  • Good All-Around Option

Cons:

  • Not all options are durable
  • Some sensitivity to extreme weather conditions and temperatures

Asphalt Shingle Roof Replacement Options

Asphalt shingles are a popular and cost-effective choice for many property owners due to their versatility and durability. These shingles are made up of layers of fiberglass mat that are coated with asphalt and covered with ceramic granules for protection against various elements such as moisture, wind, hail, and UV rays. This combination of materials makes asphalt shingles resistant to fire, rot, and pests.

Roofer Awendaw, SC

Slate Roof Replacement Options

Roofer Awendaw, SC

Slate roofing is a high-quality roofing material that is popular in South Carolina for its distinctive appearance and long-lasting benefits. Natural stone slabs form the composition of slate roofs, which are highly durable and fire-resistant. They're also resistant to rot, insects, hail, and wind damage, making them perfect for safeguarding homes in South Carolina. When considering this option, be sure to consider how long you plan to live in your current home before committing. Installation costs may be higher than other options since slate tends to be more labor-intensive than other materials.

Pros:

  • Beautiful Aesthetics
  • Long Lifespan
  • Eco-Friendly
  • Great for Protection Against South Carolina Summers & Winters

Cons:

  • Can be Fragile
  • Specialty Installation May be Required
  • Can be More Costly Than Other Roofing Options

They are lighter in weight, making them easier to install, and resistant to hail, wind, fire, and UV rays, making them ideal for protecting against harsh weather conditions common in South Carolina. What's more, metal roofs often come with long warranties and tend to be more energy-efficient than traditional roofs. With a variety of colors and styles available, you can customize your home's appearance while still taking advantage of the longevity and protection that metal roofs provide.

Pros:

  • Lightweight
  • Straightforward Roof Repairs in Awendaw
  • Potential for Lower Heating and Cooling Bills
  • Trendy and Cost-Effective

Cons:

  • May Require Specialized Installation
  • Environment Causes Metal to Expand and Contract

Metal Roof Replacement Options

Metal roofing is an excellent choice for those looking for durability, longevity, and resilience against extreme weather conditions. With a composition of thin sheets or panels of steel, aluminum, copper, or other metals typically recycled from other sources, metal roofs offer many advantages over traditional asphalt shingle roofs.

Roofer Awendaw, SC

What Client Say About Us

Exceptional Quality. Steadfast Customer Service. Reliable Roofing, Guaranteed.

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843 Roof was born out of dedication to our customers and a steadfast commitment to quality. Unlike some roofing companies in South Carolina, our business strategy is simple: work hard, don't cut corners, be honest, and provide reliable roofing guidance. It's really that simple. Whether you need a complete roof replacement, minor repairs, or something in between, your satisfaction is always top of mind. Contact our office today to experience the 843 Roof difference.

phone-number843-900-7663

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Latest News in Awendaw, SC

Awendaw, afraid of becoming Mount Pleasant, halts most new subdivisions

AWENDAW — Just stop all the rapid home construction and let us catch our breath.That’s the message this small coastal town is delivering to developers with a temporary ban on most new subdivisions.In the fastest-growing state in the nation, Awendaw is among an increasing number of local governments adopting moratoriums that halt some types of development for a short time or for many years.The justification for such moratoriums is typically to create time to update local development rules, usually to make them...

AWENDAW — Just stop all the rapid home construction and let us catch our breath.

That’s the message this small coastal town is delivering to developers with a temporary ban on most new subdivisions.

In the fastest-growing state in the nation, Awendaw is among an increasing number of local governments adopting moratoriums that halt some types of development for a short time or for many years.

The justification for such moratoriums is typically to create time to update local development rules, usually to make them more strict once the moratorium is lifted. That’s the case in Awendaw.

The rural village of about 1,400 residents in Charleston County sits just above Mount Pleasant, and the towns share a municipal border. Mount Pleasant became South Carolina’s fourth-largest municipality after decades of suburban development and has about 94,000 residents.

Mount Pleasant residents eventually got fed up with rapid growth, more traffic and crowded schools. The town now has limits on annual building permits, high development impact fees and a moratorium on multi-family construction that has been in place for seven years.

Awendaw Councilman Kent Prause had a front-row seat for much of Mount Pleasant’s love/hate relationship with growth because he was the town’s zoning administrator. Prause has been leading the push for Awendaw’s moratorium on zoning changes and subdivisions.

“Volume builders and tract home builders are coming in,” he said. “They pretty much built out Mount Pleasant and now they are coming here .”

“The people didn’t like it and that’s why the moratorium is in place,” said Prause. “They don’t want it to be Mount Pleasant.”

Boom & Balance

The Awendaw moratorium hasn’t been finalized, but it took effect in January under what’s known as the pending-ordinance doctrine. That means the rules took hold as soon as Awendaw’s council gave initial approval to the measure, although a final vote at a meeting scheduled for March 7 is still needed.

The ordinance states that “Town Council finds that the increase in the number and size of large-scale residential developments in the Town pose a risk to public health, safety, welfare, and quality of life in Awendaw...” for many reasons.

The moratorium wouldn’t halt developments that have already been approved. What it would do is:

Of course, moratoriums can also be extended, as Mount Pleasant has done multiple times with its ban on new multi-family housing.

And Awendaw’s moratorium rules could change before they get final approval. The town’s Planning Commission recommended a 10-parcel cutoff for new subdivisions, instead of five, and allowing zoning changes on parcels of less than 10 acres.

At a Town Council hearing Feb. 22, no one spoke in favor of the Planning Commission’s recommendations. Several residents urged the council to approve the moratorium without changes.

“We’ve already approved so many homes in this town,” said Susan Cox. “We need to stop it, and figure out what is going on.”

Developers paid limited attention to Awendaw for a long time because the town lacks a sewer system. New developments need to use septic systems, which require state permits and are more likely to fail in places where the water table is high.

But the Charleston area’s population growth and Mount Pleasant’s limits on development and lack of available land have increasingly pushed development up the coast.

SC Climate and Environment News

In 2022, Awendaw approved a 204-home subdivision on 148 acres near Seewee and Bulls Island roads over objections that its more than 200 septic systems could fail and send raw sewage into the waters near Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge.

Awendaw can’t ban septic systems because there’s no other option for treating household sewage, but in 2023 the town made it more difficult to build dense subdivisions where each house has a septic system. Awendaw adopted rules for minimum lot sizes, distance from wetlands and other regulations.

“It seems the less stringent rules are letting developers come in and have their way with the town,” Planning Commission member James Gardner told council members at the time.

The pending development moratorium is the latest result of a change in attitudes and leadership in Awendaw. In the earlier 2000s the town aggressively sought to grow its boundaries through annexations — prompting court challenges — and approved some large subdivisions.

“Managed growth is the key to Awendaw’s future,” reads the first sentence of a large, framed copy of the town’s vision statement, on the wall where Town Council meets.

A History of Awendaw’s First Residents

Charleston is a region steeped in history, and every corner has its own story that contributes a piece of the Lowcountry’s historical tapestry.The Town of Awendaw, located along U.S. Highway 17 N between Mount Pleasant and McClellanville in Charleston County, has Native American roots through the Sewee tribe.The Sewee tribe lived along the lower part of the Santee River, along the coast to the westward divide of the Ashley River, in present-day Moncks Corner and Dewees Island. Sewee, which means “Islanders,” w...

Charleston is a region steeped in history, and every corner has its own story that contributes a piece of the Lowcountry’s historical tapestry.

The Town of Awendaw, located along U.S. Highway 17 N between Mount Pleasant and McClellanville in Charleston County, has Native American roots through the Sewee tribe.

The Sewee tribe lived along the lower part of the Santee River, along the coast to the westward divide of the Ashley River, in present-day Moncks Corner and Dewees Island. Sewee, which means “Islanders,” were one of more than two dozen Native American tribes that occupied the South Carolina coast long before European settlers stepped foot on the coastal soil.

In 1696, settlers who retreated from Salem, Massachusetts, after the Salem Witch Trials founded “Wappetaw,” which is now known as Awendaw.

Like most Native American tribes, the Sewee people were impacted by diseases and warfare. However, their mark on the land still stands today in the form of a shell mound.

The Awendaw Sewee Shell Mound is one of the oldest and northernmost mounds found along the Carolina coast and is comprised mainly of oyster shells. Similar Native American shell rings can also be found in Mount Pleasant and Hilton Head Island. According to archeologists, the Sewee mound is believed to be roughly 4,000 years old. While it is generally thought that the mound was a dumping ground for old oyster shells, there are theories that the shell rings served a ceremonial purpose.

The Sewee Shell Ring is located near a preserved freshwater marsh, and the site can be seen from a new trail in the Francis Marion National Forest that reopened in 2022, replacing the wooden boardwalk with a fiberglass structure that is designed to last longer and withstand storms. The one-mile self-guided trail features five interpretive stops and views of wildflowers, salt marsh and tidal creeks. It’s a perfect way to immerse yourself in the beauty of the Lowcountry and experience the land where the Sewee once lived.

While little information remains about the daily lives of the Sewee people, local historians and the Town of Awendaw have made an effort to research and remember these Native Americans who lived, hunted and fished in this area. The Sewee name can be found at various establishments throughout Awendaw, such as the Sewee Outpost store, the See Wee Restaurant, the Sewee Visitor and Environmental Education Center.

Whether you’re just visiting the area or taking up permanent residence in Awendaw, be sure to plan a trip to the Francis Marion National Forest and allow yourself to walk in the woods, be surrounded by the unspoiled beauty of the Lowcountry, and visit the historic shell ring to pay tribute to Awendaw’s first residents.

Major land expansion coming to Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge in Awendaw

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - A $5 million federal investment will soon add 446 acres of land along the South Carolina shoreline.Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge is currently made up of 22 miles of barrier islands. Sarah Dawsey, the refuge manager, has been working with nature preservation since she was in high school and joined the Youth Conservation Corps.“This has been a lifelong goal for me. I mean, I can’t tell you how ecstatic I am to get this money. We have barrier islands, the refuge is barrier island...

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - A $5 million federal investment will soon add 446 acres of land along the South Carolina shoreline.

Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge is currently made up of 22 miles of barrier islands. Sarah Dawsey, the refuge manager, has been working with nature preservation since she was in high school and joined the Youth Conservation Corps.

“This has been a lifelong goal for me. I mean, I can’t tell you how ecstatic I am to get this money. We have barrier islands, the refuge is barrier islands, and they’re only accessible by boat,” Dawsey says.

Coastal Expeditions does run a ferry to Bulls Island for a fee so those interested can visit for the day. There is a public dock on the island for those with boats to use as well.

“This money will allow us to have a tract on the mainland, where we can have trails, we can have hunting, fishing, environmental education, everything that we do on the islands, but to a greater extent and you don’t have to have a boat so it’s really exciting,” Dawsey says.

She also notes that a mainland tract is a step toward a future corridor connecting the refuge to the Francis Marion National Forest.

Durwin Carter is the project leader for Cape Romain, Ace Basin, Santee and Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuges. He says any addition of land is a huge win for conservation efforts, wildlife and the people nearby who can enjoy it.

“It ties directly into what our mission is. Our mission is essentially working with other partners to conserve these lands and habitats and the critters that use it, for the public to enjoy,” Carter says.

Dawsey and Carter pointed out how erosion from storms and sea level rise are threatening the barrier islands and, in their time at the refuge, they have seen the saltwater breach into ponds on Bulls Island and encroach further into the land each year.

“With the threats happening with development and habitat fragmentation and sea level rise, any additional lands that we can conserve are going to be beneficial. We do what we do for the wildlife, for the habitats and for people to enjoy. But we also do it for future generations to enjoy,” Carter says.

The funding comes from the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund. The fund is made up from the sale of Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamps, commonly known as Duck Stamps, and import taxes.

The refuge has a visitors center located off Highway 17 where people can learn more about the conservation work and migratory bird protection the islands offer. Dawsey says people are always welcome to visit Bulls Island as long as they come with respect for the wildlife and leave it as they found it.

“If you see birds flying around or acting unusual or dive bombing you, that’s a signal that you’re close to their nest and they’re just trying to protect their babies,” Dawsey says.

Cape Romain is home to more than 290 bird species that migrate through the area as well as other animals like alligators, deer and sea turtles.

“We are just winding up our field season, so we have a really big loggerhead sea turtle project, it’s seven days a week. We do a lot of posting for birds and stewarding to keep people out of the bird areas and educating people on why it’s important,” Dawsey says.

Carter says his staff and volunteers are grateful for the land the refuge currently gets to take care of. They are looking forward to the expansion once the sale is finalized and eventually to hosting wildlife and visitors on the new mainland tracts.

“We’re really lucky to have the jobs that we have because they really enjoy their time out on the water of Cape Romain; really enjoy their times out on the trails, enjoy their times out appreciating the refuge, doing birdwatching, fishing, hunting, whatever it is, we’re constantly reminded of how great our jobs are because we get a chance to see this every day,” Carter says.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Editorial: Awendaw must rise to challenge of new development

The town of Awendaw was incorporated more than three decades ago, not so much to provide municipal services but to let residents control their planning and zoning decisions rather than relying on county government. In recent years, however, that job has become increasingly challenging because Mount Pleasant is running out of large developable sites, our region's continued growth is creating dramatic demand for more housing and Awendaw's location helps it retain much of its rural charm, wedged as it is between two environmental treasures of n...

The town of Awendaw was incorporated more than three decades ago, not so much to provide municipal services but to let residents control their planning and zoning decisions rather than relying on county government. In recent years, however, that job has become increasingly challenging because Mount Pleasant is running out of large developable sites, our region's continued growth is creating dramatic demand for more housing and Awendaw's location helps it retain much of its rural charm, wedged as it is between two environmental treasures of national significance: the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge and the Francis Marion National Forest.

It's more important than ever that town officials recognize the growing importance and intensity of their planning work — and rise to the occasion to protect the relaxed, rural ambiance that has defined this part of South Carolina's coast.

There are some encouraging signs.

A year ago, we lamented proposals to develop two large subdivisions, with 249 and 204 homes respectively, to be served by individual septic tanks since there are no sewer lines in the town. Those are still in the permitting stages and we hope they will be scaled back if they're built at all. They certainly underscore the need for state regulators to consider the cumulative impact of large subdivisions with dozens, even hundreds, of septic tanks that can compromise nearby waterways, as they have done along Shem and James Island creeks.

But the encouraging news is when yet another septic-tank subdivision was proposed recently, the Awendaw Planning Commission voted unanimously against Sewee Landing's 72 homes on 50 acres. At the same meeting, the commission recommended an update of the town's planned development ordinance that these subdivisions had relied on.

Awendaw Town Council could consider both the subdivision proposal and the ordinance rewrite as early as this week, and we urge council members to follow their planning commissioners' advice.

Even when a septic system is well-maintained, it can face problems if the water table is too high, and rising groundwater can carry the resulting contaminants to rivers and marshes, a problem that's expected to grow more acute as climate change pushes sea levels higher. Awendaw's proximity to the pristine Cape Romain makes it a desirable place to live, but too many septic tanks too close to the refuge (and too close to each other) could taint the very thing that makes the area an attractive place to visit and to live.

These developments don't pose a threat simply because they would rely on septic systems. They also would increase the amount of impervious surface and stormwater runoff, exacerbate habitat loss and degrade the community's rural character.

Awendaw is a small town that seems to have been pushed around at times. Its deal for a new park to be created by then-Charleston County Councilman Elliott Summey in exchange for Mr. Summey's right to mine dirt on the park site ended badly. The mining stopped in 2019, but the town had to sue to try to get an accounting of what was done there; the park itself is still a distant dream. In another part of town, the King Tract mine was allowed to expand even though it had been hit with more than a dozen water quality violations.

So we're encouraged that there's a proactive solution in the works. Awendaw is drafting a new comprehensive plan to replace one that's 13 years old. This process will provide town leaders, residents and others a perfect chance to forge a shared vision of how the town should manage growth, and they should make sure they make the most of this chance.

After all, the pressures on their town are only expected to intensify in the years to come.

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Zoning denial a 'win' for some Awendaw residents

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCIV) — Many Awendaw residents are calling it a "win" after the town's Zoning Commission denied a request Monday evening to rezone 66 acres for a possible development.The land in question is in the vicinity of Boomstraw Hill Road and Sewee Road and was recently annexed into the town limits from Charleston County.Developer David Weekley Homes recently acquired the neighboring Awendaw Village development, and made a brief presentation at Monday's meeting answering questions from board members and th...

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCIV) — Many Awendaw residents are calling it a "win" after the town's Zoning Commission denied a request Monday evening to rezone 66 acres for a possible development.

The land in question is in the vicinity of Boomstraw Hill Road and Sewee Road and was recently annexed into the town limits from Charleston County.

Developer David Weekley Homes recently acquired the neighboring Awendaw Village development, and made a brief presentation at Monday's meeting answering questions from board members and the public.

Read More: Proposed plan to build 72-home subdivision in Awendaw

Their proposal included creating lot sizes of 20,000 square-feet per home with a little more than 60 homes planned. But the current Agricultural zoning designation only provides for a minimum 30,000 square-foot lots. A change to Residential zoning would have decreased that limit to 12,500.

Allen Rioux serves on Awendaw's Board of Zoning Appeals and said the consensus from citizens is a desire to keep development density low.

"We're certainly not anti-development or anti-developer. We understand that this is a desirable place to be, and - in fact - we think that development is important for our community, for our tax base," Rioux said. "But, what the community is against is high-density development. We need to be reasonable. We have great resources here and we need to be careful that we don't negatively impact them."

Read More: Environmentalists fear impacts of 200 new homes near Awendaw wildlife refuge

Others at Monday's meeting called the request premature.

David Weekley Homes faces some challenges with the land. First and foremost, access.

The parcels are currently land-locked, meaning there's no road legal road access. However, a phase to development of their recently acquired Awendaw Village off Highway 17 would provide an adjacent connection to the 66-acres.

Read More: People still concerned after hearing developer's redevelopment plan for Union Pier

A few residents from Awendaw Village were at the zoning meeting and voiced their concerns over unfulfilled promises from their original developer.

David Weekley Homes will likely need to return before town council or the Zoning Commission with an updated development proposal.

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