Storm Damage & Insurance Specialists!

Roofer in Seabrook Island, SC

We find ways to get insurance to cover not only repairs, but complete roof replacements, siding, gutters and windows

If you're a homeowner or a business owner, take a moment to think about the roof of your home or storefront. When was the last time it was inspected for leaks and general reliability? If you're like most folks in the Lowcountry, it's been a while. When it comes to home maintenance, your roof is one of the last items that you consider for repairs and replacements. Maybe that's because DIY roof repairs and roof replacements are difficult and dangerous for the average person. Maybe it's because your roof has been a steadfast symbol of reliability and protection for years. Whatever the reason, we get it - roofing issues just aren't something that people want to face.

If you're a homeowner or a business owner, take a moment to think about the roof of your home or storefront. When was the last time it was inspected for leaks and general reliability? If you're like most folks in the Lowcountry, it's been a while. When it comes to home maintenance, your roof is one of the last items that you consider for repairs and replacements. Maybe that's because DIY roof repairs and roof replacements are difficult and dangerous for the average person. Maybe it's because your roof has been a steadfast symbol of reliability and protection for years. Whatever the reason, we get it - roofing issues just aren't something that people want to face.

Service Areas

The 843 Roof Difference

head-bot-style

As innovators in the roofing industry, we take roof repair in Seabrook Island seriously. Your roof is an integral player in your family's safety, and as such, it deserves the very best service possible. When it's no longer protecting your family like it should, we'll replace it with a better alternative.

Roofer Seabrook Island, SC

If you're reading this, though, you're probably curious to learn more about our company. As our name denotes, we live in the Lowcountry. Our kids go to school in the Lowcountry. Our families are here in the Lowcountry - and we strive to serve others here in the Lowcountry just as we would like to be served. With more than 20 years of combined expertise mastering the craft of roofing, we're proud to epitomize honesty, integrity, and respect with every service we offer. To that point, some of our most popular roofing services include the following:

  • Free Estimates
  • Roof Inspections
  • Roof Repair
  • Roof Maintenance
  • Roof Replacement
  • Commercial Roofing Services
  • Leaky Roof Repair
  • Flat Roof Repair

So, whether it's a small repair for a few blown-off shingles or catastrophic damage after a hurricane, our team of professionals has the tools and training to provide peace of mind when you need it most. If you see our trucks out, please stop us, and introduce yourself! It would be our pleasure to get to know you and your family and provide you with the quality roofing services you deserve.

Speaking of South Carolina roofing services, our licensed and highly-trained technicians are the cream of the crop. We can help with just about any roofing need you have and strive to do so with the utmost respect for your time and property.

Our Process

head-bot-style

From minor leak fixes to total roof replacement in Seabrook Island, there's no job too large or small for 843 Roof. Regardless of the roofing service you need, we follow a specific process to ensure your safety, satisfaction, and peace of mind.

We Consult with You

We Consult with You

During your first consultation, we'll meet with you one-on-one so that we can better understand the scope of work regarding your roof. After we evaluate your roof, we'll go in-depth about your roof repair or replacement options, taking care to consider your budget and unique needs.

Proposal

Proposal

Once we have a good understanding of your roofing needs, we'll craft a detailed roofing proposal for your home or business. In your proposal, we'll include information about the materials we'll use for your roofing job, a timeline of when we'll finish, and the estimated costs you'll need to pay.

Our Roofers Get to Work

Our Roofers Get to Work

Once you approve our proposal, we're off to the races. During your project installation, we treat your home as if it were our own - no questions asked. Over the course of your project, our team of expert roofing contractors will work tirelessly to provide you with the high-level craftsmanship you expect. Of course, we'll keep you updated on our progress, and when we're done, we'll clean up behind ourselves.

We Conduct a Final Inspection

We Conduct a Final Inspection

Once your roofing project is complete, we'll swoop in for a final inspection to ensure all t's are crossed, and all i's are dotted. After all, the devil is often found in the details, and we don't want that. If we find more work that needs to be done, we'll let you know and will complete that work ASAP. If you have questions, we'll address them before we hit the road. Once you're happy and protected from the elements, we'll move on to the next project, and you can enjoy life with a trustworthy roof over your head.

How Do I Choose a Quality Roofer in Seabrook Island?

head-bot-style

At 843 Roof, we're proud to say that we put customers first. At the end of the day, their safety and security are of utmost importance. We know that any savvy home or business owner will do due diligence to find the best roofing company for their needs. To help ensure you get the very best products and services available, keep these questions in mind.

Roofer Seabrook Island, SC

1. Can you tell me about your experience in the roofing industry?

Think of this question a little bit like a job interview, if you were the hiring manager. You're not asking how long the company has been in business - you're asking about their overall level of experience as roofers. If it seems like they're new to the game, consider other options. At 843 Roof, our contractors have 20+ years of combined knowledge, with decades of on-site experience handling a wide range of roofing projects, both large and small.


2. Do you have insurance?

Any South Carolina roofer worth their salt will have company insurance that protects your property and home in the event of accidental damage. In fact, they should be willing to show you their certificate of insurance as proof. Contact 843 Roof today to learn more about our insurance and how it protects your home.


3. Will you give me a written estimate?

If you ever encounter a roofing company that is unwilling to give you a written estimate, be wary. Like 843 Roof, a great roofing company will happily provide a written estimate containing the details and description of your roofing project.

4. Will you tell me about shingle styles and roof choices if I need a roof replacement?

Replacing your roof is a serious investment. As such, your roofing contractor should be able to talk at length about your roof replacement options, from the style of shingles or other materials you need, to the type of roof best suited to your property. At 843 Roof, we always provide our customers with plenty of info on roof styles, material choices, prices, and more, so they can make an informed decision about their roof replacement.


5. Can you give me a list of references?

This might sound a tad "old school," especially with the prevalence of online reviews. With that said, the very best roofers will happily give you a list of references to check and will encourage you to reach out to them. At 843 Roof, our reviews speak for themselves - please contact us directly for roof repair and replacement references.


843 Roof Pro Tip

At the end of the day, trust your gut. Do you feel the roofing contractor you're speaking with has a good communication style? Do you feel they take the time to listen to your concerns and answer your questions? Regardless of the price differences between roofing companies, trust your instincts when it comes to the best fit for you and your project. If you're running into communication issues before the project even starts, it's a big red flag.

Roofer Seabrook Island, SC

Roof Repair in Seabrook Island A Service Too Important to Ignore

head-bot-style

Maintaining a secure roof for your home and family is crucial. Any necessary repairs should be taken seriously - even if they don't seem so serious on the surface. A failed or leaky roof can lead to disastrous consequences, which is why it's imperative that you seek professional help rather than attempting to fix the issue yourself.

Roofer Seabrook Island, SC

At 843 Roof, our experts understand how devastating it is when water, weather, or critters damage your roof. These issues often affect every inch of your home, from the insulation in the attic down to your basement family room. As a homeowner, you want to ensure that your home is protected and secure, and our roofers can help make that happen.

Some of the most popular roof repair services we provide to our amazing clients in South Carolina include:

  • Asphalt Shingle Repair
  • Roof Leak Repair
  • Gutter Repair
  • Roof Flashing Repair
  • Roof Ventilation Repair
  • Roof Mildew Removal
  • Storm Damage Repair
  • Tree Damage Repair
  • Standing Water Repair
  • Much More

If you're on the fence about whether or not you should have your roof inspected for repairs, don't wait any longer. Your home's roof might only be a South Carolina thunderstorm away from needing to be completely replaced. Before you have to deal with a huge roofing headache, call 843 Roof and let us do the hard work for you.

Start Fresh with a Roof Replacement in Seabrook Island

head-bot-style

When it comes to getting a new roof for your home, there's no room for error. That's why you need licensed professionals who can handle complex and intensive processes with ease. While it may seem like a significant investment, the long-term benefits are undeniable. You'll enjoy increased safety, comfort, and a higher home value. At 843 Roof, we're the top choice for roof installations in South Carolina.

Our team of experts has a proven track record of successful roof replacement projects. Unlike some roofing companies, we hold ourselves to the highest standards for product longevity, customer satisfaction, and quality craftsmanship. Whether you're looking to upgrade your roof or need a replacement due to damage or disrepair, we're the experts you can rely on.

We specialize in a number of roof replacement options, including the following:

  • Asphalt Shingle Roof Replacement
  • Slate Roof Replacement
  • Metal Roof Replacement
  • Clay Tile Roof Replacement
  • Residential Roof Replacement
  • Commercial Roof Replacement
Roofer Seabrook Island, SC

Most Popular Roof Replacement Materials in South Carolina

Get Estimateright-arrow

Your roof is one of the sturdiest components of your home. Like all things, however, it can deteriorate with time. That's especially true in South Carolina, where humidity, storms, hurricanes, and tree damage can take a toll. Before you know it, your roof has sprung a leak, which can snowball into bigger issues. When you're shelling out money every quarter for roof maintenance, you will reach a point where a roof replacement in Seabrook Island makes the most sense. That's where 843 Roof comes into play.

At 843 Roof, we understand your desire for a high-quality new roof that meets your needs and budget. Our team of experts will work closely with you to ensure transparency in our pricing and supplies used, providing unbeatable value for your investment. With a focus on top-notch customer service, we guarantee an exceptional experience when you choose us, whether you need a roof replacement for your home or business.

But choosing a new roof can be easier said than done. There are a lot of things to consider, such as choosing the roof replacement materials you want to use. To help make your life a little easier, keep these popular options in mind.

Asphalt shingles have a wide range of colors, styles, shapes, and sizes to suit your needs, too. One of the major advantages of asphalt shingles is their affordability compared to other roofing materials like slate and metal, which can be pricey. However, it's important to note that asphalt shingles may not hold up as well as slate and metal during hurricanes in South Carolina. Fortunately, advancements in technology have led to the development of premium quality asphalt shingles with increased durability, such as those with algae-resistant granules or impact-resistant reinforcements, which can better protect against severe weather conditions.

Pros:

  • Very Affordable
  • Endless Options
  • Easy to Install
  • Lightweight
  • Good All-Around Option

Cons:

  • Not all options are durable
  • Some sensitivity to extreme weather conditions and temperatures

Asphalt Shingle Roof Replacement Options

Asphalt shingles are a popular and cost-effective choice for many property owners due to their versatility and durability. These shingles are made up of layers of fiberglass mat that are coated with asphalt and covered with ceramic granules for protection against various elements such as moisture, wind, hail, and UV rays. This combination of materials makes asphalt shingles resistant to fire, rot, and pests.

Roofer Seabrook Island, SC

Slate Roof Replacement Options

Roofer Seabrook Island, SC

Slate roofing is a high-quality roofing material that is popular in South Carolina for its distinctive appearance and long-lasting benefits. Natural stone slabs form the composition of slate roofs, which are highly durable and fire-resistant. They're also resistant to rot, insects, hail, and wind damage, making them perfect for safeguarding homes in South Carolina. When considering this option, be sure to consider how long you plan to live in your current home before committing. Installation costs may be higher than other options since slate tends to be more labor-intensive than other materials.

Pros:

  • Beautiful Aesthetics
  • Long Lifespan
  • Eco-Friendly
  • Great for Protection Against South Carolina Summers & Winters

Cons:

  • Can be Fragile
  • Specialty Installation May be Required
  • Can be More Costly Than Other Roofing Options

They are lighter in weight, making them easier to install, and resistant to hail, wind, fire, and UV rays, making them ideal for protecting against harsh weather conditions common in South Carolina. What's more, metal roofs often come with long warranties and tend to be more energy-efficient than traditional roofs. With a variety of colors and styles available, you can customize your home's appearance while still taking advantage of the longevity and protection that metal roofs provide.

Pros:

  • Lightweight
  • Straightforward Roof Repairs in Seabrook Island
  • Potential for Lower Heating and Cooling Bills
  • Trendy and Cost-Effective

Cons:

  • May Require Specialized Installation
  • Environment Causes Metal to Expand and Contract

Metal Roof Replacement Options

Metal roofing is an excellent choice for those looking for durability, longevity, and resilience against extreme weather conditions. With a composition of thin sheets or panels of steel, aluminum, copper, or other metals typically recycled from other sources, metal roofs offer many advantages over traditional asphalt shingle roofs.

Roofer Seabrook Island, SC

What Client Say About Us

Exceptional Quality. Steadfast Customer Service. Reliable Roofing, Guaranteed.

head-bot-style

843 Roof was born out of dedication to our customers and a steadfast commitment to quality. Unlike some roofing companies in South Carolina, our business strategy is simple: work hard, don't cut corners, be honest, and provide reliable roofing guidance. It's really that simple. Whether you need a complete roof replacement, minor repairs, or something in between, your satisfaction is always top of mind. Contact our office today to experience the 843 Roof difference.

phone-number843-900-7663

Get Estimate

Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

The Best Islands In South Carolina, According To Our Readers

From celebrated golf courses to unspoiled beaches, these destinations have it all.South Carolina is often referred to as the Palmetto State, so named for the abundance of the trees in the area, but it could just as easily be dubbed the Barrier Island State. With 34 barrier and tidal islands peppering its shoreline (more than any other state ...

From celebrated golf courses to unspoiled beaches, these destinations have it all.

South Carolina is often referred to as the Palmetto State, so named for the abundance of the trees in the area, but it could just as easily be dubbed the Barrier Island State. With 34 barrier and tidal islands peppering its shoreline (more than any other state except for Florida), South Carolina spills over with natural wonders, beautiful beaches, and unique destinations to explore. In our 2024 South's Best awards, readers voted on some of the very best of them. Here are the best islands in South Carolina, according to our readers.

The South's Best 2024

01 of 10

Hilton Head Island

With 12 miles of public beaches, more than 24 championship golf courses, and around 250 restaurants, Hilton Head's numerical stats alone prove why it's one of the state's most beloved islands. But the real magic, of course, belongs to its community—a mix of transplants and born-and-breds who are sure to make you feel right at home, whether you're sampling local oysters at Hudson's on the Docks or watching the boats come in at Shelter Cove Marina.

Explore Hilton Head

02 of 10

Isle of Palms

There’s nothing sleepy about this mile-wide destination just a short drive from downtown Charleston, where the activity and restaurant offerings belie its small size. Catch a concert at beachfront venue The Windjammer, play golf or tennis at nearby resort Wild Dunes (where you can book a stay in one of the property’s two inns or numerous vacation rentals), or shake out your towel on a sliver of the island’s six miles of sandy beaches for a leisurely day in the sun.

Explore Isle of Palms

03 of 10

Kiawah Island

While much of this tree-shaded barrier island is accessible only to those staying at Kiawah Island Golf Resort (either at The Sanctuary hotel or in one of their many rental properties), Beachwalker Park on the island’s west end is home to one of the state’s most beautiful beaches. Here, you’ll find both ocean-fronting shoreline and river views and can rent chairs and umbrellas for a no-fuss beach day. On your way, pick up deli sandwiches from The Station, an old-school convenience store in Freshfields Village, for an easy picnic.

Explore Kiawah Island

04 of 10

Edisto Island

This sea island about an hour’s drive from Charleston feels like a throwback in all the best ways. You won’t find high-rise hotels here, and the wildest nights are Tuesdays and Thursdays from the end of May through the beginning of August when the Edisto Island Lions Club hosts bingo (no booze allowed). For seasonally driven fare made with locally sourced ingredients, settle in for a meal at Ella and Ollie's (pictured above). The area’s crowning jewel is Botany Bay, a 4,600-acre nature preserve with nearly three miles of unspoiled shoreline, where erosion has left dead trees in its wake, resulting in a beautiful, otherworldly span referred to as the “boneyard beach.”

Explore Edisto Island

05 of 10

Sullivan’s Island

Just two-and-a-half miles long, Sullivan’s is a secret that Charleston locals are keen to keep. First settled in the late 17th century, the island can claim an embarrassment of riches when it comes to both historical significance and natural beauty. The wide beaches are pristine, and there’s nary a trace of touristy kitsch on Middle Street, the town’s main drag—just a handful of memorable eateries (we’re partial to The Obstinate Daughter’s house-made pastas) and well-curated shops (visit Sandpiper Gallery to peruse the work of local artists). The bitty beach town is big on curb appeal too: thoughtfully maintained historic homes and storybook cottages with flower-swamped trellises line the streets that crawl toward the beach.

06 of 10

Folly Island

About a dozen miles from downtown Charleston, this 12-square-mile barrier island is best known for being home to Folly Beach, a laid-back surf town that departs from the Holy City’s tucked-in approach in favor of flip-flop casual. With the Folly River on one side and the Atlantic Ocean on the other, there’s no shortage of opportunities for waterfront fun: Paddle through tidal creeks with a local outfitter, stretch out on the sand (there are six miles of beachfront here), or cast a line from the historic Folly Beach Pier, which recently reopened after extensive renovations.

Explore Folly Beach

07 of 10

Hunting Island

Just a 25-minute drive from downtown Beaufort, explore the seaside charmer's wilder side at Hunting Island State Park (South Carolina's most popular state park). Here, five miles of unspoiled beaches unfurl along the Atlantic and sandy trails wind through dense maritime forest.

08 of 10

Daufuskie Island

As the crow flies, the southernmost of South Carolina’s barrier islands is just miles from Savannah and Hilton Head, but it might as well be worlds away. Daufuskie is accessible only by boat (the official ferry offers four shuttles from Bluffton a day, five on Fridays), which is likely one of the reasons its 500 or so residents have been able to so carefully preserve its natural environment and its rich Gullah history. And while the island remains untouched in many ways, that doesn’t mean there’s nothing to see or do here: Tour the island with sixth-generation Daufuskie native Sallie Ann Robinson for an education in Gullah culture; go for a horseback ride on the beach; shop indigo-dyed goods at Daufuskie Blues; and cap off the day with a plate of deviled crab at Old Daufuskie Crab Company.

Explore Daufuskie

09 of 10

Fripp Island

About 20 miles from Beaufort, Fripp Island is a 3,000-acre designated wildlife sanctuary, home to more than 175 species of birds, plus endangered loggerhead turtles who use its beach as a nesting ground. The private island is accessible only to homeowners and those staying in vacation rentals, but once you're here, there's plenty to do, from guided kayak eco-tours to pickleball and golf.

Right next door to Kiawah Island, Seabrook has stunning saltmarsh vistas and celebrated golf courses, along with a full-service equestrian center that offers guided horseback rides. Its nearly four miles of beaches are private, accessible only to residents and those renting, though Bohicket Marina (just before the property’s gates) welcomes anyone and everyone to enjoy its river views. Snag a table on the upper deck of Salty Dog Cafe to tuck into fresh seafood with one of the area’s most memorable sunsets.

Editorial: We dodged a bullet on Seabrook. Make sure it doesn't happen again.

Everyone who cares about southern Johns Island should be pleased that a controversial annexation was pulled from the Seabrook Island Town Council's agenda last week in the face of mounting opposition over what the annexation would help create — a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages — and the likelihood that it would add more traffic and pollution to the rural side of Charleston County's urban growth boundary.But those same folks, particularly leaders on Kiawah and Seabrook islands...

Everyone who cares about southern Johns Island should be pleased that a controversial annexation was pulled from the Seabrook Island Town Council's agenda last week in the face of mounting opposition over what the annexation would help create — a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages — and the likelihood that it would add more traffic and pollution to the rural side of Charleston County's urban growth boundary.

But those same folks, particularly leaders on Kiawah and Seabrook islands and Charleston County Council, should not get complacent. Instead, they need to work together on better planning to guide development in and around where those two sea islands meet up with southern Johns Island.

It's unclear when, or if, the developer's annexation request might resurface. Even if it doesn't, there undoubtedly will be other development plans that will expose the tensions between those living on rural Johns Island and those living beyond the gates at Kiawah and Seabrook. This moment offers an important reset, one that should begin with getting all these local governments to recommit to the vision of an urban growth boundary — a line past which suburban development would not be supported through zoning, infrastructure or other local policies.

Such a recommitment wouldn't bind future councils any more than their respective comprehensive plans do, but it would send a unified message about their mutual commitment to respect the natural beauty and environmental sensitivity of the area.

It's clear that development pressures at Kiawah's and Seabrook's doorstep are increasing. A fresh series of new developments, including a senior living facility and an emergency medical facility, is cropping up. Elected officials, neighborhood leaders and county planners need to come up with a mutually agreed-upon zoning overlay for the area, one that would guide future development to ensure new uses and the size and scale of new buildings are appropriate. Such an overlay also would prevent developers from trying to play one jurisdiction against another to get the permits they seek, a tactic sometimes used in other parts of the tri-county area.

The mutual interests of everyone became clear during this recent annexation controversy, as the mayor of Kiawah Island took the unusual step of sending a letter to Seabrook's mayor and council urging them to reject the annexation and respect the urban growth boundary, which Mayor John Labriola noted "serves as a guide to direct appropriate urban and suburban development while preserving and cherishing the rural charm of the Sea Islands that we all hold dear."

Given what we've seen this summer, the existing urban growth boundary line may not continue to be enough on its own, and we believe a joint planning effort could help pin down the following: to what extent commercial development in the greater Freshfields area should be allowed to inch its way north on Betsy Kerrison; whether the towns should annex any more of Johns Island; whether any upzoning in the area might be appropriate; and how new building would affect the net traffic and drainage needs around Kiawah and Seabrook. While residents live only on Kiawah or Seabrook or in the unincorporated area, they have a stake in the answers to all those questions. This area deserves a new zoning overlay and conservation goals that offer a shared vision of how the southern part of Johns Island will — and will not — change.

Regional planning needs to take place on a large scale — such as our greater metro area from Seabrook to Awendaw to Summerville and Moncks Corner — but it's also necessary on a smaller scale, especially in those places such as southern Johns Island where multiple local governmental jurisdictions meet.

Decades ago, the city of Charleston and Charleston County came up with the urban growth boundary across Johns Island and other areas where the suburbs ended to ensure their zoning and other policies worked together to protect rural areas that residents wanted to remain rural. Kiawah and Seabrook were once seen as too distant to bring into the conversation about that line. That's not the case any more.

Click here for more opinion content from The Post and Courier.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

First-ever committee addresses Seabrook Island short-term rentals

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A first-time special committee on short-term rentals is hearing Seabrook Island residents’ concerns and hopes for the island’s future.The Seabrook Island Town Council established a Special Committee on Short-Term Rentals on Jan. 4 with the members being appointed on Jan. 23.The committee’s purpose is to study short-term rental activities and trends within the town. This could involve limiting the number of short-term rentals, limiting the ownership of multiple short-term rentals,...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A first-time special committee on short-term rentals is hearing Seabrook Island residents’ concerns and hopes for the island’s future.

The Seabrook Island Town Council established a Special Committee on Short-Term Rentals on Jan. 4 with the members being appointed on Jan. 23.

The committee’s purpose is to study short-term rental activities and trends within the town. This could involve limiting the number of short-term rentals, limiting the ownership of multiple short-term rentals, what fees are reasonable, etc.

Seabrook Island is home to 2,345 family homes and villas and 588 of those are short-term rentals, according to the town.

With about 25% of the island being taken up by short-term rentals, some residents say there are issues that need to be addressed.

“Agitating alligators,” Seabrook Island resident John Lagna said during Wednesday’s first public forum. “Secondly, speeding. Thirdly, ignoring stop signs... Lastly, ignoring amenity rules.”

However, not everyone agrees.

“There are a number of factors that have entered into it, but short-term rentals seem to be an easy target,” resident Debra Hardick said.

The committee says they are referencing data from peak COVID-19 times from when the number of renters significantly increased.

Resident Paul McLaughlin says the growth of the island has impacted the overall sense of community.

“If you don’t know who your neighbors are, it’s just not a very good feeling,” McLaughlin said.

The committee is made up of a town councilman, homeowners and even short-term rental owners who have been on the island for around a decade or more. They say the town has previously had an Ad Hoc Committee to address this topic, which was allowed to be done privately, but they want this one to be public to increase transparency.

Darryl May is the only town councilman on the short-term rental committee while the other seven are residents.

“So, the goal of this committee is to develop a set of proposals for the town council to pass an ordinance,” May said.

During the public forum, some shared ideas for what that ordinance may or may not look like.

“I think we should allow renters,” resident Ann Laporte said. “I think we should allow a minimum of three nights. No more than that.”

Resident Bill Boissonalt has another idea, adding that the town shouldn’t still be referencing data from peak COVID in 2020.

“I just don’t believe that we need any new regulations regarding the overnight stay, the capped rentals, based on history,” Boissonalt said.

As far as what the committee thinks the ordinance could look like, May says he doesn’t want to jump the gun.

“I won’t hazard to guess because we’re just starting out this process and we want to have a very open mind,” May said. “But we do anticipate getting an ordinance by about June.”

There are still three more public hearings over the next two weeks and the committee encourages Seabrook Island residents and those who rent on the island to speak.

Click here to read more about past short-term rental data and sign up for public comment.

Read below for the details on the next three public forums:

Public Forum #2

Public Forum #3

Public Forum #4

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Hicks: No smooth sailing in the forecast for Seabrook annexation plan

For its first annexation in more than 30 years, Seabrook Island’s Town Council picked a real doozy.Next week, council will likely vote to annex nearly 18 acres on Bohicket Creek — just across from neighboring Kiawah Island’s Town Hall — for a mixed-use development designed around a marina and private yacht club.The details are a tad fuzzy (well, as much as they can be with a 200-page proposal), but public sentiment is not.Nearly 600 residents have expressed concerns about the project’s poten...

For its first annexation in more than 30 years, Seabrook Island’s Town Council picked a real doozy.

Next week, council will likely vote to annex nearly 18 acres on Bohicket Creek — just across from neighboring Kiawah Island’s Town Hall — for a mixed-use development designed around a marina and private yacht club.

The details are a tad fuzzy (well, as much as they can be with a 200-page proposal), but public sentiment is not.

Nearly 600 residents have expressed concerns about the project’s potential environmental, traffic and flooding impact. That’s more than a quarter of the island’s full-time residents.

They've made it clear they don't want this, but feel like no one's listening.

“The vast majority of people have been opposed to this,” says island resident Paul McLaughlin. “They don’t have to listen to us, but don’t go and ask for our opinion if you don’t listen to the answers. It offers no benefit to us; it’s a private club.”

His frustration is understandable, because a lot of people have valid concerns.

The state already considers that stretch of Bohicket too contaminated for oyster harvesting; the feds say it’s not safe to eat fish caught there. The state turned down similar plans 30 years ago … which is about the last time Seabrook gave any thought to expanding its borders.

McLaughlin notes the developer's plan may address flooding on the property, but what does it do to the rest of the island?

Residents can't leverage their usual influence over local officials, several of whom publicly support the plan, because most of them aren’t running for reelection.

It’s sort of a perfect storm — and, on Seabrook, it’s definitely storm season.

Local government is usually the most responsive to local citizens. A couple dozen bicyclists can — and did — derail Charleston’s carefully negotiated plans to redesign downtown's King Street. But hundreds of well-heeled retirees can’t move the needle?

The island's planning commission recommended the annexation on a 4-1 vote in July over vocal opposition. Residents get one more chance next week at a public hearing prior to an initial annexation vote, but aren’t optimistic.

They’ll get 30 minutes — three minutes per speaker — to relay their concerns in a room that holds an audience of about 60. That's pretty standard operating procedure for local governments, but Seabrook residents are livid. The town, they say, has ignored repeated calls for a larger venue and more time.

Seabrook Mayor John Gregg says the developer has held informational meetings with residents for the past year, and when the island got the proposal in June, the town posted all documents online.

He says the alternative meeting venues suggested are all behind Seabrook’s private gate — and council meetings must be accessible to the public. Besides, he says, Town Hall is fitted with equipment to broadcast the meeting to the entire island.

If more people want to speak than time allows, the mayor says, speakers will be chosen by a random number algorithm generator.

That probably won’t make residents, or others, happy. Because this isn't just some not-in-my-backyard grousing. The Coastal Conservation League, the nonprofit Kiawah Conservancy and various Johns Island advocates have also objected. Even Kiawah has taken an unprecedented stand.

Earlier this month, Kiawah Mayor John D. Labriola and Town Council members sent a letter to Seabrook, publicly opposing the annexation.

“We strongly believe that maintaining the current [urban growth boundary] is critically important to protect the unique Sea Islands ecosystem and the rural character of the land outside the boundary for future generations,” Labriola wrote.

That's called foreshadowing.

Seabrook Councilwoman Jeri Finke wrote in the most recent issue of The Seabrooker that annexing the land gives the town control over it, which is better than allowing Charleston County or Kiawah to make the decisions. Her argument hasn't moved many.

That’s because Kiawah Mayor Labriola hit on a salient point. Since the land falls outside the urban growth boundary, its potential development would be fairly limited … if Seabrook just stayed out of this.

See, right now that land falls under county jurisdiction, and County Council would never ignore such a large and influential group of citizens.

But Seabrook’s annexation blocks county intervention because the town isn't party to the urban growth boundary agreement. That allows a few outgoing public officials to open the door to new development.

The Andell tract, as this land is called, sits at the end of Betsy Kerrison Parkway — an area just outside two wealthy communities under tremendous development pressure. Already, more businesses, a retirement community and an entire medical district are in the works.

But that land was never meant to be developed, at least not to this extent. That’s what the urban growth boundary dictates. The overdevelopment of Maybank Highway was meant as a trade-off to leave the rest of Johns Island largely rural.

Such plans often shrivel when there's money to be made — this is proof of that. But the marina development could also bring renewed scrutiny to the urban growth boundary and spark radical change ... because people are sick of overdevelopment.

But that's a story for another day.

At the hyper-local level, Seabrook officials should know their audience ... er, constituents. These are people who know how to get things done. They know how to file lawsuits. And they don’t give up.

So don’t expect next week’s vote to be the last word.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Email

Reach Brian Hicks at bhicks@postandcourier.com.

Planned yacht club advances after Seabrook Island board OKs annexation, land use change

SEABROOK ISLAND — Three decades after a plan to create a 400-slip marina through a canal and lock project on Johns Island was rejected, a scaled-down proposal calls for a private yacht club on nearly 18 acres in the same general area on Bohicket Creek.Conservationists and several area ...

SEABROOK ISLAND — Three decades after a plan to create a 400-slip marina through a canal and lock project on Johns Island was rejected, a scaled-down proposal calls for a private yacht club on nearly 18 acres in the same general area on Bohicket Creek.

Conservationists and several area residents oppose the development called Andell, but Seabook Island's Planning Commission voted 4-1 on July 12 to recommend annexing the site and zoning the property for a mixed-used development. Town council will have final say.

Bohicket Creek Investors LLC of Charleston wants to build a boat dock with a private clubhouse, boathouse and poolhouse along with outdoor amenities and 10 rental cottages for members and the public at 4484 Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

"Annexing gives Seabrook future control of the site," said Mike Shuler, the property owner's principal and managing partner. "It will substantially limit future development of the site."

The property, currently zoned for agricultural and residential use in unincorporated Charleston County, would allow "a variety of agricultural and light industrial uses ... which could have significantly greater impact on the existing natural features than the proposed development," according to the town's planning staff, which recommended conditional project approval.

Real Estate

Among those opposing the project is the Coastal Conservation League.

Robby Maynor, the Charleston-based environmental group's communities and transportation program director, said the project is outside the region's "urban growth boundary" and called the proposed development "a step in the opposite direction" of protecting rural acreage.

He also cited potentially adverse effects from pollution runoff into Bohicket Creek, increased boat traffic and encroachment into critical habitat areas.

A half dozen others cited similar concerns before the Planning Commission's vote. The board also noted it had received more than 500 comments about the proposal with the vast majority in opposition.

Proponents of the project said that the property's current zoning allows multiple uses than what's being proposed, that the town will have more control over the property if it is annexed and that the development will provide recreational opportunities.

Get the best of the Post and Courier's Real Estate news, handpicked and delivered to your inbox each Saturday.

Email

Real Estate

The project's name is similar to a proposed development from 30 years ago called Andell Harbor that called for a massive earth-moving operation with a man-made channel connecting to a large marina. State environmental regulators eventually nixed the idea in the mid-1990s.

The yacht club site is beside Bohicket Marina, which also is owned by Shuler's group, and the two would be connected by a boardwalk and road. The planned entrance to the new development is across from Kiawah Island Town Hall.

Cottages would flank both sides of the drive leading to the yacht club.

Plans show the development on about 4 acres of the site near the creek. The rest of the property would be set aside as open space, including a 75-foot wooded buffer next to the parkway and a 20-foot vegetated area next to the northwest parcel in the county.

The site also would include a public boardwalk, pathways and a community crabbing dock.

Bohicket Creek Investors bought the tract in 2021 for $5.6 million, according to Charleston County land records. Nearby properties include Freshfields Village Shopping Center.

Real Estate

Bohicket Marina, which is in the town of Seabrook Island, is southwest of the proposed development.

If the property is annexed into the town, it would tie into the town's sewer system, with St. John's Water Co. proving water service

The yacht club would be separate from the community and recreational facilities provided by Seabrook Island Property Owners Association and Seabrook Island Club.

Town Council is scheduled to review the proposal on Aug. 22. The measure requires a public hearing and two majority votes in separate meetings to pass.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

Roof Maintenance, Installation, and Repairs Service
Any Questions? We are Ready to Help!

Icon