Storm Damage & Insurance Specialists!

Roofer in James Island, SC

We find ways to get insurance to cover not only repairs, but complete roof replacements, siding, gutters and windows

If you're a homeowner or a business owner, take a moment to think about the roof of your home or storefront. When was the last time it was inspected for leaks and general reliability? If you're like most folks in the Lowcountry, it's been a while. When it comes to home maintenance, your roof is one of the last items that you consider for repairs and replacements. Maybe that's because DIY roof repairs and roof replacements are difficult and dangerous for the average person. Maybe it's because your roof has been a steadfast symbol of reliability and protection for years. Whatever the reason, we get it - roofing issues just aren't something that people want to face.

If you're a homeowner or a business owner, take a moment to think about the roof of your home or storefront. When was the last time it was inspected for leaks and general reliability? If you're like most folks in the Lowcountry, it's been a while. When it comes to home maintenance, your roof is one of the last items that you consider for repairs and replacements. Maybe that's because DIY roof repairs and roof replacements are difficult and dangerous for the average person. Maybe it's because your roof has been a steadfast symbol of reliability and protection for years. Whatever the reason, we get it - roofing issues just aren't something that people want to face.

Service Areas

The 843 Roof Difference

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As innovators in the roofing industry, we take roof repair in James Island seriously. Your roof is an integral player in your family's safety, and as such, it deserves the very best service possible. When it's no longer protecting your family like it should, we'll replace it with a better alternative.

Roofer James Island, SC

If you're reading this, though, you're probably curious to learn more about our company. As our name denotes, we live in the Lowcountry. Our kids go to school in the Lowcountry. Our families are here in the Lowcountry - and we strive to serve others here in the Lowcountry just as we would like to be served. With more than 20 years of combined expertise mastering the craft of roofing, we're proud to epitomize honesty, integrity, and respect with every service we offer. To that point, some of our most popular roofing services include the following:

  • Free Estimates
  • Roof Inspections
  • Roof Repair
  • Roof Maintenance
  • Roof Replacement
  • Commercial Roofing Services
  • Leaky Roof Repair
  • Flat Roof Repair

So, whether it's a small repair for a few blown-off shingles or catastrophic damage after a hurricane, our team of professionals has the tools and training to provide peace of mind when you need it most. If you see our trucks out, please stop us, and introduce yourself! It would be our pleasure to get to know you and your family and provide you with the quality roofing services you deserve.

Speaking of South Carolina roofing services, our licensed and highly-trained technicians are the cream of the crop. We can help with just about any roofing need you have and strive to do so with the utmost respect for your time and property.

Our Process

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From minor leak fixes to total roof replacement in James Island, there's no job too large or small for 843 Roof. Regardless of the roofing service you need, we follow a specific process to ensure your safety, satisfaction, and peace of mind.

We Consult with You

We Consult with You

During your first consultation, we'll meet with you one-on-one so that we can better understand the scope of work regarding your roof. After we evaluate your roof, we'll go in-depth about your roof repair or replacement options, taking care to consider your budget and unique needs.

Proposal

Proposal

Once we have a good understanding of your roofing needs, we'll craft a detailed roofing proposal for your home or business. In your proposal, we'll include information about the materials we'll use for your roofing job, a timeline of when we'll finish, and the estimated costs you'll need to pay.

Our Roofers Get to Work

Our Roofers Get to Work

Once you approve our proposal, we're off to the races. During your project installation, we treat your home as if it were our own - no questions asked. Over the course of your project, our team of expert roofing contractors will work tirelessly to provide you with the high-level craftsmanship you expect. Of course, we'll keep you updated on our progress, and when we're done, we'll clean up behind ourselves.

We Conduct a Final Inspection

We Conduct a Final Inspection

Once your roofing project is complete, we'll swoop in for a final inspection to ensure all t's are crossed, and all i's are dotted. After all, the devil is often found in the details, and we don't want that. If we find more work that needs to be done, we'll let you know and will complete that work ASAP. If you have questions, we'll address them before we hit the road. Once you're happy and protected from the elements, we'll move on to the next project, and you can enjoy life with a trustworthy roof over your head.

How Do I Choose a Quality Roofer in James Island?

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At 843 Roof, we're proud to say that we put customers first. At the end of the day, their safety and security are of utmost importance. We know that any savvy home or business owner will do due diligence to find the best roofing company for their needs. To help ensure you get the very best products and services available, keep these questions in mind.

Roofer James Island, SC

1. Can you tell me about your experience in the roofing industry?

Think of this question a little bit like a job interview, if you were the hiring manager. You're not asking how long the company has been in business - you're asking about their overall level of experience as roofers. If it seems like they're new to the game, consider other options. At 843 Roof, our contractors have 20+ years of combined knowledge, with decades of on-site experience handling a wide range of roofing projects, both large and small.


2. Do you have insurance?

Any South Carolina roofer worth their salt will have company insurance that protects your property and home in the event of accidental damage. In fact, they should be willing to show you their certificate of insurance as proof. Contact 843 Roof today to learn more about our insurance and how it protects your home.


3. Will you give me a written estimate?

If you ever encounter a roofing company that is unwilling to give you a written estimate, be wary. Like 843 Roof, a great roofing company will happily provide a written estimate containing the details and description of your roofing project.

4. Will you tell me about shingle styles and roof choices if I need a roof replacement?

Replacing your roof is a serious investment. As such, your roofing contractor should be able to talk at length about your roof replacement options, from the style of shingles or other materials you need, to the type of roof best suited to your property. At 843 Roof, we always provide our customers with plenty of info on roof styles, material choices, prices, and more, so they can make an informed decision about their roof replacement.


5. Can you give me a list of references?

This might sound a tad "old school," especially with the prevalence of online reviews. With that said, the very best roofers will happily give you a list of references to check and will encourage you to reach out to them. At 843 Roof, our reviews speak for themselves - please contact us directly for roof repair and replacement references.


843 Roof Pro Tip

At the end of the day, trust your gut. Do you feel the roofing contractor you're speaking with has a good communication style? Do you feel they take the time to listen to your concerns and answer your questions? Regardless of the price differences between roofing companies, trust your instincts when it comes to the best fit for you and your project. If you're running into communication issues before the project even starts, it's a big red flag.

Roofer James Island, SC

Roof Repair in James Island A Service Too Important to Ignore

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Maintaining a secure roof for your home and family is crucial. Any necessary repairs should be taken seriously - even if they don't seem so serious on the surface. A failed or leaky roof can lead to disastrous consequences, which is why it's imperative that you seek professional help rather than attempting to fix the issue yourself.

Roofer James Island, SC

At 843 Roof, our experts understand how devastating it is when water, weather, or critters damage your roof. These issues often affect every inch of your home, from the insulation in the attic down to your basement family room. As a homeowner, you want to ensure that your home is protected and secure, and our roofers can help make that happen.

Some of the most popular roof repair services we provide to our amazing clients in South Carolina include:

  • Asphalt Shingle Repair
  • Roof Leak Repair
  • Gutter Repair
  • Roof Flashing Repair
  • Roof Ventilation Repair
  • Roof Mildew Removal
  • Storm Damage Repair
  • Tree Damage Repair
  • Standing Water Repair
  • Much More

If you're on the fence about whether or not you should have your roof inspected for repairs, don't wait any longer. Your home's roof might only be a South Carolina thunderstorm away from needing to be completely replaced. Before you have to deal with a huge roofing headache, call 843 Roof and let us do the hard work for you.

Start Fresh with a Roof Replacement in James Island

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When it comes to getting a new roof for your home, there's no room for error. That's why you need licensed professionals who can handle complex and intensive processes with ease. While it may seem like a significant investment, the long-term benefits are undeniable. You'll enjoy increased safety, comfort, and a higher home value. At 843 Roof, we're the top choice for roof installations in South Carolina.

Our team of experts has a proven track record of successful roof replacement projects. Unlike some roofing companies, we hold ourselves to the highest standards for product longevity, customer satisfaction, and quality craftsmanship. Whether you're looking to upgrade your roof or need a replacement due to damage or disrepair, we're the experts you can rely on.

We specialize in a number of roof replacement options, including the following:

  • Asphalt Shingle Roof Replacement
  • Slate Roof Replacement
  • Metal Roof Replacement
  • Clay Tile Roof Replacement
  • Residential Roof Replacement
  • Commercial Roof Replacement
Roofer James Island, SC

Most Popular Roof Replacement Materials in South Carolina

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Your roof is one of the sturdiest components of your home. Like all things, however, it can deteriorate with time. That's especially true in South Carolina, where humidity, storms, hurricanes, and tree damage can take a toll. Before you know it, your roof has sprung a leak, which can snowball into bigger issues. When you're shelling out money every quarter for roof maintenance, you will reach a point where a roof replacement in James Island makes the most sense. That's where 843 Roof comes into play.

At 843 Roof, we understand your desire for a high-quality new roof that meets your needs and budget. Our team of experts will work closely with you to ensure transparency in our pricing and supplies used, providing unbeatable value for your investment. With a focus on top-notch customer service, we guarantee an exceptional experience when you choose us, whether you need a roof replacement for your home or business.

But choosing a new roof can be easier said than done. There are a lot of things to consider, such as choosing the roof replacement materials you want to use. To help make your life a little easier, keep these popular options in mind.

Asphalt shingles have a wide range of colors, styles, shapes, and sizes to suit your needs, too. One of the major advantages of asphalt shingles is their affordability compared to other roofing materials like slate and metal, which can be pricey. However, it's important to note that asphalt shingles may not hold up as well as slate and metal during hurricanes in South Carolina. Fortunately, advancements in technology have led to the development of premium quality asphalt shingles with increased durability, such as those with algae-resistant granules or impact-resistant reinforcements, which can better protect against severe weather conditions.

Pros:

  • Very Affordable
  • Endless Options
  • Easy to Install
  • Lightweight
  • Good All-Around Option

Cons:

  • Not all options are durable
  • Some sensitivity to extreme weather conditions and temperatures

Asphalt Shingle Roof Replacement Options

Asphalt shingles are a popular and cost-effective choice for many property owners due to their versatility and durability. These shingles are made up of layers of fiberglass mat that are coated with asphalt and covered with ceramic granules for protection against various elements such as moisture, wind, hail, and UV rays. This combination of materials makes asphalt shingles resistant to fire, rot, and pests.

Roofer James Island, SC

Slate Roof Replacement Options

Roofer James Island, SC

Slate roofing is a high-quality roofing material that is popular in South Carolina for its distinctive appearance and long-lasting benefits. Natural stone slabs form the composition of slate roofs, which are highly durable and fire-resistant. They're also resistant to rot, insects, hail, and wind damage, making them perfect for safeguarding homes in South Carolina. When considering this option, be sure to consider how long you plan to live in your current home before committing. Installation costs may be higher than other options since slate tends to be more labor-intensive than other materials.

Pros:

  • Beautiful Aesthetics
  • Long Lifespan
  • Eco-Friendly
  • Great for Protection Against South Carolina Summers & Winters

Cons:

  • Can be Fragile
  • Specialty Installation May be Required
  • Can be More Costly Than Other Roofing Options

They are lighter in weight, making them easier to install, and resistant to hail, wind, fire, and UV rays, making them ideal for protecting against harsh weather conditions common in South Carolina. What's more, metal roofs often come with long warranties and tend to be more energy-efficient than traditional roofs. With a variety of colors and styles available, you can customize your home's appearance while still taking advantage of the longevity and protection that metal roofs provide.

Pros:

  • Lightweight
  • Straightforward Roof Repairs in James Island
  • Potential for Lower Heating and Cooling Bills
  • Trendy and Cost-Effective

Cons:

  • May Require Specialized Installation
  • Environment Causes Metal to Expand and Contract

Metal Roof Replacement Options

Metal roofing is an excellent choice for those looking for durability, longevity, and resilience against extreme weather conditions. With a composition of thin sheets or panels of steel, aluminum, copper, or other metals typically recycled from other sources, metal roofs offer many advantages over traditional asphalt shingle roofs.

Roofer James Island, SC

What Client Say About Us

Exceptional Quality. Steadfast Customer Service. Reliable Roofing, Guaranteed.

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843 Roof was born out of dedication to our customers and a steadfast commitment to quality. Unlike some roofing companies in South Carolina, our business strategy is simple: work hard, don't cut corners, be honest, and provide reliable roofing guidance. It's really that simple. Whether you need a complete roof replacement, minor repairs, or something in between, your satisfaction is always top of mind. Contact our office today to experience the 843 Roof difference.

phone-number843-900-7663

Get Estimate

Latest News in James Island, SC

Proposed James Island preschool sparks drainage worry for neighboring homeowners

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The site of a proposed preschool on James Island is causing some neighbors to worry about what their yards will look like during a storm or what the traffic will look like during rush hour.The city of Charleston’s Design Review Board approved the basics, like what kind of building materials and plants the developer wants to use, for example, at the proposed Goddard Preschool located at 1137 Folly Rd., ...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The site of a proposed preschool on James Island is causing some neighbors to worry about what their yards will look like during a storm or what the traffic will look like during rush hour.

The city of Charleston’s Design Review Board approved the basics, like what kind of building materials and plants the developer wants to use, for example, at the proposed Goddard Preschool located at 1137 Folly Rd., at Tuesday night’s meeting.

However, neighbor Matthew Pertuset says he’s more worried about what the city will review later on.

“How is that going to affect the, not just the people that back up, but the entire neighborhood?” Pertuset said.

The proposed preschool sits directly behind Pertuset’s home in the Queenborough neighborhood. He says he’s worried about the design of this building’s drainage because of how it already acts during storms.

“We’re already holding water,” Pertuset said. “So, for that to come up even more, I’m not sure. So, it’s a huge concern.”

But Robert Summerfield, the director of planning, preservation and sustainability for the city of Charleston, said because they have some of the most comprehensive stormwater regulations in the region, no project could make the problem worse but could only improve it.

“They’re working very hard to make sure that they are utilizing the existing wetlands on site and enhancing that as a stormwater catchment area,” Summerfield said.

But that’s not the only concern.

“If it is going to be a pickup, you know, we’re right here on Folly Road, how does that look during rush hour traffic in the mornings and the afternoons?” Pertuset said. “Is it going to get pushed into our neighborhood for us to deal with or is it just going to come to a stop on Folly Road?”

Summerfield said the city has already thought about it.

“We have created a drop-off low space so that cars, as they come in and drop their children off or pick them up, will actually flow through the site so that there’s a queueing situation that will occur so that people aren’t ideally not queueing out on Folly,” Summerfield said.

Neither the Goddard School nor the applicant, AAG Architects for Vista 26, LLC, have responded to requests for comment.

However, Pertuset said no matter what comes on this property, he just wants the city to be thorough with their plans.

“It is something that the community needs,” Pertuset said. “I think James Island could afford to have another preschool.”

Summerfield said the city will discuss more drainage specifics once the developer submits the next step to the Technical Review Committee. They will have to pass all initial designs before that is done and there’s currently no timeline of when that might take place.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Homeowners fight to keep rain garden in flood-prone James Island yard; can HOA be stopped?

JAMES ISLAND — Whenever it rained, Craig and Jamie Bussard knew their yard would flood.It became saturated every time the skies opened up ever since they moved into their home on Ocean Neighbors Boulevard in 2015.Over time, the Bussards just accepted it as their reality.But then they saw a way out: plant a rain garden, a round space where native plants would soak up the downpour.The city of Charleston liked the idea and gave the couple a grant. The Homeowners Association and property manager signed off, too,...

JAMES ISLAND — Whenever it rained, Craig and Jamie Bussard knew their yard would flood.

It became saturated every time the skies opened up ever since they moved into their home on Ocean Neighbors Boulevard in 2015.

Over time, the Bussards just accepted it as their reality.

But then they saw a way out: plant a rain garden, a round space where native plants would soak up the downpour.

The city of Charleston liked the idea and gave the couple a grant. The Homeowners Association and property manager signed off, too, or the couple thought they did. And everything worked the way it was supposed to.

Until it didn't.

In November, the HOA said the rain garden didn’t get necessary approvals and demanded its removal. After months of correspondence, the HOA gave the Bussards until Feb. 27 to remove it. After that, the HOA threatened to hire a contractor to forcibly remove the garden of grasses and flowering plants at the Bussards’ expense.

“It just sends the wrong message to the entire neighborhood that the neighborhood doesn't care about environmental concerns or the environmental benefits and doesn't take the flooding measures seriously,” Craig Bussard said. “It just sets a bad precedent.”

But the fight goes on.

Floodwater management

Like many Lowcountry properties, lighter rains would cause water to collect and the ground to become soggy and muddy. Heavier rains would result in standing water that sometimes took weeks to drain away. Mosquitos were always a concern for the Bussards' young children and pets.

“We had kind of accepted it as something beyond our control and just grown used to not using that part of the yard or the gate on the side of the house,” Craig said noting that the flooding also afflicted their adjoining and sympathetic neighbor’s yard.

“That side yard that we share, it's just a mud pit any time it rains, any sort of amount,” said Kayleigh Coda, the Bussards' neighbor. “That's where our trash cans are taken in and out from the backyard, so it's just a mess.”

Then the Bussards heard about the Charleston’s Rainproof Mini-Grant Program, which provides homeowners with $200 and training on how to properly install a rain garden on their property.

Rain gardens are sunken gardens that capture stormwater and help it absorb into the ground within 24 hours. This can prevent runoff that can flood neighbors’ yards and streets.

“The responsible way is to keep the water on your property, and rain gardens allow you to do that,” said Katy Calloway, a resident of the Ocean Neighbors community who specializes in stormwater management.

The idea piqued the Bussards’ interest: What if they didn’t have to accept flooding as their reality? What if they planted a rain garden and it worked to benefit not just them but their neighbors too?

“As soon as (the grant application) opened, we applied to it, and we also shared to the community Facebook page … how excited we were about this and how we’d love to see this in the community more because we're on James Island, where things flood constantly,” Craig said.

The Bussards submitted their application in August and were notified it had been accepted the following month. Throughout September, the Bussards completed the required in-person and online training on rain gardens and what to do to make it successful: Rain gardens require careful planning and attention to soil, elevation and selected plants.

Rising Waters

“One of the key parts of making sure a rain garden is successful is choosing a location, so you’re supposed to perform a few different tests,” Craig said. “When it rains really heavily, you’re supposed to go out into your yard and watch the water flow.”

It surprised Craig and Jamie when these tests revealed the front yard would be a better location than the backyard, he noted.

“It’s a lot of work,” said Coda, who has a rain garden in her backyard. “ … A lot of effort and time goes into it, picking the right local plants, which ones go together really well, the spacing and all of that.”

Miscommunications with the HOA would prove to be even more work for the Bussards, putting not just their garden at risk, but the future of sustainable landscaping practices for the entire community.

Miscommunication

The Bussards submitted their plans to their HOA and property management company, Poston Community Management, in September. Their application included the garden’s proposed front-yard location and the combination of flowering plants and grasses they planned to use.

Dean Monk, chairman of the HOA’s Architectural Control Committee, emailed his approval, “as long as we keep it according to the covenants, basically weeding and making sure nothing overgrows,” Craig said.

But the next day, property manager spokesperson Melissa Blocker sent an email contradicting the chairman’s decision: The committee denied the Bussards' application.

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After requesting the reason, Blocker wrote in an email to the Bussards that the committee researched rain gardens and noted that they can “get out of control and look unkempt/unmaintained.”

“Any kind of landscaping can become messy and unkempt if it's not maintained, so that just seemed really irrelevant,” Craig noted.

News

After multiple correspondences, the Bussards pointed out that the neighborhood’s guidelines both encourage experimentation with native plants and don’t require approval for the addition of plants under 36 inches in height.

Since the rain garden didn’t include any plants over that height, the Bussards and property manager agreed they did not need additional approvals, Craig said. Blocker acknowledged this in writing on Oct. 6.

She did not respond to requests for comment.

On the weekend of Oct. 22, they dug the 200 square-foot flowerbed and planted native plants, including Stokes aster, sweetspire, black-eyed Susans, bee balm and echinacea. They also routed the gutter drain and added three bags of mulch, Craig recalled.

A few days later, Blocker notified the Bussards that there was a misunderstanding: Since the rain garden is a new flower bed that adds to their overall footprint, it does need HOA approval. She wrote in the email that the HOA requested them to stop all work on the garden until they get approval, but by that point, the rain garden was already finished, Craig said.

“We’d already completed everything, other than maybe four or five additional bags of mulch that we needed,” he said. “All the plants were there, and everything was dug and everything was ready to go.”

Craig said they finished mulching the garden at that point to make it more aesthetically pleasing and to protect the newly planted plants.

The Bussards submitted another application to the HOA committee on Oct. 30, which was denied about a week later. The committee stipulated that the rain garden had to be removed and filled in with dirt and sod within 30 days.

The Bussards appealed to the HOA’s Board of Directors, which consists of five community members, including HOA president Ellen Souter. The board also denied the request.

Souter declined to comment on the record due to ongoing litigation.

In a Facebook comment, Souter wrote, "There are two sides to every story."

Calloway, a member of the board at this time, said that she and one other board member voted in favor of the Bussards’ request. The remaining three members, including Souter, voted against.

“Craig's project, in my opinion, was mishandled by the HOA from the get-go,” Calloway said, noting the reason for this change was based on the aesthetic of the garden.

“The concern was not about practicality and stormwater management,” she said. “The concern is that the Bussards’ yard is at the front of the neighborhood, and people see it, and they don’t think it’s pretty.”

Rain gardens take time to grow and flower, Calloway, Coda and the Bussards said.

“That's really tough because a natural yard that's functioning for the good of the environment looks very different than a yard that's full of grass and has no plants,” Calloway said.

The Bussards and Coda said the rain garden has “definitely” helped alleviate flooding issues. Craig said they’ve tried to negotiate with the HOA, without success.

“We’ve been willing and begging, basically … to work something out here,” he said. “This is for the good of the community. It seems like there are some misunderstandings between (the property manager), board and the (Architectural Control Committee), but let’s try to work this out and be adults. But my attempts to negotiate have just flat-out been refused.”

The HOA’s attorney notified the Bussards’ attorney that the HOA will give them until Feb. 27 to remove their rain garden. Otherwise, the HOA would hire a contractor to do so at the Bussards’ expense, Craig said.

No formal written notice of this action had been issued by the time of publication.

A garden worth fighting for

Craig said they had every intention to uproot the garden the weekend of Feb. 23, but they couldn’t bring themselves to do it. The Bussards turned to the community for support for one last try. They posted on their community’s Facebook page on Feb. 24.

“It instantly blew up,” Craig said. “We've not gotten a single negative response other than from the board president.”

The Bussards hosted an information session at their home on Feb. 25 and got more than 20 signatures on a petition to save the garden within the first 30 minutes of the meeting, Craig said.

This show of support inspired the Bussards to try and keep their garden.

“We truly believe that the environmental benefits and drastic improvements in flooding mitigation the rain-proof garden has achieved is worth fighting for,” he said.

SC High School League denies appeals by James Island, Burke

The first challenges to the S.C. High School League’s reclassification of its member schools began on Tuesday, as 12 schools appealed their placement in the league's realignment for the 2024-26 school years.Ten more schools will make their appeals on Wednesday.School officials made their cases to the league’s executive committee, and can take their appeals to the league’s appellate panel later this week. A total of 22 schools statewide are lodging appeals with the executive committee.Most of the appeals...

The first challenges to the S.C. High School League’s reclassification of its member schools began on Tuesday, as 12 schools appealed their placement in the league's realignment for the 2024-26 school years.

Ten more schools will make their appeals on Wednesday.

School officials made their cases to the league’s executive committee, and can take their appeals to the league’s appellate panel later this week. A total of 22 schools statewide are lodging appeals with the executive committee.

Most of the appeals center around the SCHSL's decision to use a multiplier to determine student enrollments for its purposes, with students attending a school from outside of its assigned attendance zone counting three times. The multiplier was installed in an effort to address competitive-balance issues, with private and charter schools dominating state championships in lower classifications in recent years.

Three Charleston-area schools made their appeals on Tuesday.

James Island Charter, moved to Class AAAAA in reclassification, had its request to remain in AAAA denied. Burke, moved up to Class AA, had its appeal to remain in Class A denied.

Charleston Math & Science, moved up to Class AAA from Class A, won its appeal to remain in Class A for the next two years.

Bishop England, bumped up from Class AA to AAAA, will have its appeal to move to Class AAA heard on Wednesday.

Columbia's Gray Collegiate Academy, a sports-oriented charter school and a center of much of the competitive-balance debate, was bumped up two classifications, from AA to AAAA, by the league's multiplier. The school requested to play in Class AAA, but was denied by a vote of 12-3.

James Island officials made their case to remain AAAA by saying the school was willing to remain in Region 7-AAAA, which includes Colleton County and Beaufort-area schools. The school said it was willing to accept a considerable increase in travel expenses over what it would incur in a local AAAAA region.

Members of the committee noted that James Island’s attendance numbers, which total 1,968 including the multiplier, would place the school in Class AAAAA even without the multiplier, but only because the league has increased the number of AAAAA schools to 56.

After discussion, the committee voted 14-1 to deny the request to remain in AAAA.

Charleston Math & Science, which is currently in Class A, was reclassified to AAA by the league. The school, which is not competitive for state titles in most programs, hinted that a move to AAA could result in the school closing all of its athletics programs. School officials said the athletic department operates at a deficit as a Class A school.

According to the multiplier numbers, CMS would be the smallest school in AAA with 672 students, and would have almost 400 actual students fewer than two schools, Dillon and Newberry, just ahead of them in the AAA list.

The committee decided by a vote of 12-3 to allow CMS to remain in Class A for the next two years.

Burke appealed a move from Class A to AA based on a decline in competitiveness, even though its attendance numbers are solidly in Class AA even without the multiplier. Enrollment numbers, however, are in a steady decline; Burke's multiplier attendance number is 469.

The committee voted 14-1 to put Burke in Class AA. Burke could be reassigned to Class A in the next reclassification in 2026.

In other appeals on Tuesday, Abbeville High was denied (by 9-5) an appeal to be assigned to Class A. Abbeville is currently listed as the smallest AA school in the state (379 students with the multiplier), while three schools in Class A have larger attendance numbers. Abbeville will appeal the decision to the appellate panel.

Seneca High’s appeal to remain in Class AAA was denied (14-1), and the school will be assigned to AAAA.

Fox Creek won its appeal (by 11-3) to move to Class AAA. Fox Creek was originally bumped from Class AA to Class AAAA in the realignment.

Southside Christian, a private school in Simponsville, was denied (by 9-5) its appeal to move from Class AAA to AA. Southside Christian was moved from Class A to AAA in the recent reclassification with a multiplier attendance number of 676.

Brashier Middle College, a charter school in the upstate, was assigned to Class AAA, a move up from Class A. The school appealed to be classified to Class AA and the committee granted that request by a vote of 12-4.

High Point Academy, a Class A school in Spartanburg, was moved to Class AAA after use of the multiplier. The school appealed to stay in Class A, but was denied. However, the committee did vote to place the school into Class AA.

Horse Creek Academy of North Augusta, moving into the SCHSL for the first time, was classified to AAA. However, the school offers only 10 varsity sports and one junior varsity program, and does not field a football program. The committee voted to put the school in Class A.

St. Joseph’s Catholic School of Greenville, currently in Class A, was reclassified to Class AAA and requested to be placed in Class AA. The committee denied the request by 12-2.

Standing water in James Island ditches frustrating some residents

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Ditches running through a James Island neighborhood are still holding several inches of water from Monday’s storm, frustrating some residents who say they don’t know who is responsible for maintaining the ditches.Kat Skover lives on James Island in a neighborhood near the intersection of Folly and Fort Johnson Roads.She says the standing water attracts flies and mosquitos and impacts her ability to play outside with her daughter.“We got the house so that we could be in the ba...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Ditches running through a James Island neighborhood are still holding several inches of water from Monday’s storm, frustrating some residents who say they don’t know who is responsible for maintaining the ditches.

Kat Skover lives on James Island in a neighborhood near the intersection of Folly and Fort Johnson Roads.

She says the standing water attracts flies and mosquitos and impacts her ability to play outside with her daughter.

“We got the house so that we could be in the backyard and hang out outside but with the difficulty of all the drainage and the water it can be really difficult to keep the yard in a state that is enjoyable,” she says.

The water can also affect the safety of the roadways, she says.

“Some streets will even have water on the street for a day or two following a heavy rain,” she says.

Her neighbor, Nicholas Connolly, says the ditches fill up fast during a storm and will stay filled for days.

“The ground is really soft, and if you walk around your feet will sink into your yard,” he says. “I’ve not once seen the city come and redo the ditches.”

Skover says she’s called the James Island Public Service District for help but got waitlisted.

“We’re on a schedule we’ve heard of, but that was several months ago,” she says.

The neighborhood sits in the jurisdiction of the Town of James Island.

James Island Mayor Brook Lyon says the problem is typically caused by clogged pipes under driveways. If the town is alerted of a drainage problem, they’ll come clean it out with a shovel, she says.

If it’s packed too hard or the driveway is too wide, they’ll call Charleston County or the South Carolina Department of Transportation for help with a vacuum truck.

The town doesn’t have any record of drainage complaints from the neighborhood, according to Lyon.

She encourages anyone with an issue to file a complaint on the Town’s website under the “MyTOJI” tab, or by calling Town Hall at 843-795-4141.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Charleston Co. moves forward with James Island intersection improvements

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - One concerned resident living on James Island says there is a lack of communication on a traffic project that was designed to improve the safety and flow of traffic.The Central Park Road and Riverland Drive Intersection Improvements Project was made to improve the safety and traffic flow of Riverland Drive and Central Park Road for all modes of transportation while minimizing impacts on adjacent property and grand trees. The project officially began in 2018 and is still in the works.More than 11,000 ve...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - One concerned resident living on James Island says there is a lack of communication on a traffic project that was designed to improve the safety and flow of traffic.

The Central Park Road and Riverland Drive Intersection Improvements Project was made to improve the safety and traffic flow of Riverland Drive and Central Park Road for all modes of transportation while minimizing impacts on adjacent property and grand trees. The project officially began in 2018 and is still in the works.

More than 11,000 vehicles a day commute on Riverland Drive, according to the Charleston County Transportation Department, and the lack of turn lanes and significant delays have prompted a plan to relieve traffic congestion at the intersection of Riverland Drive and Central Park Road.

The need for more crosswalks, signs and designated areas, frequent accidents, narrow lanes and delays for school traffic are just a few reasons officials say the project is needed. The funding for the project comes from the second half-cent sales tax.

Eric Lundcrum lives on Terrabrook Lane on James Island and says the road hasn’t been upgraded and the growth continues to climb in the area.

Charleston County spokesperson Kelsey Barlow says the county intends to install crosswalks and a flashing light at the Central Park and Riverland intersection. The project will also add a right-turn lane with refuge on Central Park and a sidewalk along Riverland Drive that will extend to the future Woodland Shores sidewalk to the Riverland Drive multi-use path.

“We should have some consideration on completing some of these projects that are way overdue,” Lundcrum says. “The Charleston County Council is always 20 years behind upgrading infrastructure to satisfy the growth. The other solution was just to put a traffic light there, but they didn’t even do that. Year after year of more growth and year after year no solution to the very busy intersection.”

We reached out to officials from Charleston County who told us the South Carolina Department of Transportation has approved the right-of-way plans, and they are currently in the right-of-way acquisition process. They are scheduled to advertise construction in the third quarter of this year. Currently, officials say the project team has made contact with impacted property owners and working with them for the right-of-way acquisition process.

If you know a road that’s driving you crazy, you can submit your concern here.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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